Moses Ennis1

M, #59925
Last Edited24 Jan 2002
Marriage*Moses Ennis married Mary

Child of Moses Ennis and Mary

Citations

  1. [S936] Jean Agnes (Ferguson) Smith, "Compiled Records of Jean Agnes (Ferguson) Smith, author of 'Ennis History'" (10215 150 St. Apt. 226, Surrey, B.C., Canada). . Hereinafter cited as "Compiled Records of Jean Agnes (Ferguson) Smith, author of 'Ennis History.'"

Murray Joseph Ennis1

M, #59065, b. 7 December 1902
FatherJoseph 'Joe' Morden Ennis b. 16 Mar 1874, d. 3 Jun 1911
MotherMartha Aveline 'Avie' Galloway b. 26 Jun 1874, d. 25 Oct 1966
Last Edited24 Jan 2002
Note*Murray Joseph Ennis was born December 7, 1902 in Neepawa, Manitoba,Canada. Murray settled in Winnipeg and married Marion Annie McMullanand is now retired from the Great West Life Assurance Company of Winnipeg. 
Birth*Murray Joseph Ennis was born on 7 December 1902 in Neepawa, Manitoba, Canada.1 
He was the son of Joseph 'Joe' Morden Ennis and Martha Aveline 'Avie' Galloway
Marriage*Murray Joseph Ennis married Marion Annie McMullan on 12 July 1930. In Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.1 

Family: Murray Joseph Ennis and Marion Annie McMullan

Citations

  1. [S1213] Jean Agnes (Ferguson) Smith, Ennis History, Part 2 (: privately published, 1979). Hereinafter cited as Ennis History, Part 2.

Phyllis Anne Ennis1

F, #59027, b. 6 April 1914
FatherSydney Melville Ennis b. 6 May 1872, d. 4 Jul 1950
MotherElizabeth 'Lizzie' Gourlay b. 14 Apr 1875, d. 4 Dec 1919
Last Edited24 Jan 2002
Birth*Phyllis Anne Ennis was born on 6 April 1914 in Kelwood, Manitoba, Canada.1 
She was the daughter of Sydney Melville Ennis and Elizabeth 'Lizzie' Gourlay

Citations

  1. [S1213] Jean Agnes (Ferguson) Smith, Ennis History, Part 2 (: privately published, 1979). Hereinafter cited as Ennis History, Part 2.

Raymond William Ennis1

M, #59080, b. 13 December 1905
FatherWilliam 'Will' Thomas Ennis b. 15 Jan 1879, d. 28 Apr 1966
MotherHattie Matilda Larson b. 6 Jan 1887, d. 10 Aug 1966
Last Edited24 Jan 2002
Birth*Raymond William Ennis was born on 13 December 1905 in Minidoka, Minidoka County, Idaho, U.S.A..1 
He was the son of William 'Will' Thomas Ennis and Hattie Matilda Larson
Marriage*Raymond William Ennis married Thelma Elaine Dunn on 24 May 1926.1 

Family: Raymond William Ennis and Thelma Elaine Dunn

Citations

  1. [S1213] Jean Agnes (Ferguson) Smith, Ennis History, Part 2 (: privately published, 1979). Hereinafter cited as Ennis History, Part 2.

Richard Thomas Ennis1

M, #54528, b. 1834, d. 30 July 1925
FatherDavid Ennis b. 1807
MotherIsabella Ellis b. 1811
Last Edited16 Dec 2006
Note*PART II The story of Richard Thomas Ennis being lost has been past down fromgeneration to generation. We had been told that Tom was one of four boyswhen the family emigrated from Ireland. In the article below of Tom'sobituary it states there was eventually a family of ten, possibly morechildren being born to his parents after their arrival in the UnitedStates. We had been told that Tom was raised by a Minister and his wife,their names are not known to anyone. In the obituary of one of Tom andFanny's daughters, Jessie Lavina, her parent's names were listed asRichard Thomas Ennis and Fanny Ennis. This is the only time I have founda second name mentioned for Tom Ennis. The Ennis farm and barn arestill in use today. The house has a two foot thick rock foundation. Thebarn has the same sturdy foundation with large hand hewn beams. Tom andFanny have over three hundred direct descendents to date (1979), livingfrom Ontario across Canda to British Columbia, as well as some living inthe United States. It has been very interesting work for me trying tocompile this information about my ancestors. I hope everyone will enjoygetting to know their family. --- Sherrie Lyne (Ennis) HalmeHaines 4863 Cordova Bay Road, Victoria, B.C., Canada V8y 2J9 Phone1-250-658-8429 E-mail:
Birth*Richard Thomas Ennis was born in 1834 in Armagh, Northern Ireland.1 
He was the son of David Ennis and Isabella Ellis
Marriage*Richard Thomas Ennis married Francis 'Fanny' Jane Taylor on 24 December 1857. In Kleinburg, Peel County, Ontario, Canada.1 
Death*Richard Thomas Ennis died on 30 July 1925, in Brussels, Huron County, Ontario, Canada.1 

Children of Richard Thomas Ennis and Francis 'Fanny' Jane Taylor

Citations

  1. [S1213] Jean Agnes (Ferguson) Smith, Ennis History, Part 2 (: privately published, 1979). Hereinafter cited as Ennis History, Part 2.

Robert Ennis1

M, #49155
FatherRobert Strain Ennis
MotherElizabeth Shouldice
Last Edited24 Jan 2002
Robert Ennis was the son of Robert Strain Ennis and Elizabeth Shouldice
Note*They had three children by this marriage, at this time Robert and Eliza'sparentage is not known. Robert Strain Ennis lived with Robert Ennis in 1851, as per a letterwritten on the 18 January, 1998 by Jean Agnes (Ferguson) Smith to DonaldRaymond Coy. See 'ENNIS HISTORY', by Jean Agnes (Ferguson) Smith, published 1979pages 123 - 125. William lived across the road from Robert Strain Ennis at Bracebridge,Muskoka County, Ontario and in an old letter to the McFarlins referred toRobert Strain Ennis as uncle Bob. At this time William's Spouse is a MissEsther and it is not known or whether they had children. William could be a brother to Robert Strain Ennis, who married FrancesWark according to Jean Agnes (Ferguson) Smith, publisher of ENNISHISTORY, she believes he is. See 'ENNIS HISTORY', by Jean Agnes (nee Ferguson) Smith, published 1979page124. From: 'Sherrie Haines' Subject: McFarlin Family Sent: Friday, January 15, 1999 10:52 PM To: Donald Coy Hello Don, To answer your question: see page 123 'Aunt Maggie Ford' you can add thefollowing information to what was on pages 123 & 124: In 1851 Robert Strain Ennis was living with Robert Ennis, widower. Alsoliving with Robert Ennis was: William Ennis, Joseph Ennis, Ann Jane Ennis, Margaret Ennis, ElizabethEnnis with one member of the family absent - that was Robert Ennis Jr. Robert Ennis, widower - his wife was Eliza Strain. William Ennis - whomarried Esther and lived eventually in Bracebridge, Ont. Joseph Ennis - don't know what happened to him. Ann Jane 'Nancy' Ennis married Thomas Musson Wright. Margaret Phedora 'Maggie' Ennis married Henry Ford. Elizabeth Ennis married Henry McFarlin. Bye for now, Sherrie E-mail: Sherrie Lyne Halme(Ennis) Haines, 4863 Cordova Bay Road, Victoria, B.C. Canada V8Y 2J9. 
Marriage*Robert Ennis married Eliza Strain on 4 March 1829.2 

Children of Robert Ennis and Eliza Strain

Citations

  1. [S1037] Death Certificate - Margaret (Ennis) Ford, Margaret (Ennis) Ford entry. Personal Archives of Donald Coy, Seattle, Washington, U.S.A.. Hereinafter cited as Death Certificate - Margaret (Ennis) Ford.
  2. [S935] Jean Agnes (Ferguson) Smith, Ennis History (: Privately Published, 1979). Hereinafter cited as Ennis History.

Robert 'Osmond' Osmond Ennis1

M, #48265, b. 18 November 1897, d. 22 October 1954
FatherJoseph William 'Joe' Ennis b. 24 Feb 1865, d. 10 Jan 1947
MotherMargaret Esther 'Maggie' McDonell b. 17 Dec 1875, d. 28 Jan 1965
Last Edited24 Jan 2002
Note*Robert 'Osmond' Osmond Ennis, broke an arm when he was small.Grandfather Ennis set it. And at 18 years of age, enlisted in theCanadian Army and served overseas in World War I. After returning home,he tried farming and various other jobs, including a second stint atfarming before settling in the employ of the Central Alberta Dairy Poolin 1936 where he remained until his death in 1954. 
Birth*Robert 'Osmond' Osmond Ennis was born on 18 November 1897 in Wolseley, Saskatchewan, Canada.1 
He was the son of Joseph William 'Joe' Ennis and Margaret Esther 'Maggie' McDonell
Marriage*Robert 'Osmond' Osmond Ennis married Hazel 'Babe' Victoria Blakely on 17 November 1927. In Big Valley, Alberta, Canada.1 
Death*Robert 'Osmond' Osmond Ennis died on 22 October 1954, at age 56, in Red Deer, Alberta, Canada.1 

Family: Robert 'Osmond' Osmond Ennis and Hazel 'Babe' Victoria Blakely

Citations

  1. [S935] Jean Agnes (Ferguson) Smith, Ennis History (: Privately Published, 1979). Hereinafter cited as Ennis History.

Robert 'R C' Cosby Ennis1

M, #58621, b. 15 November 1858, d. 13 November 1925
FatherRichard Thomas Ennis b. 1834, d. 30 Jul 1925
MotherFrancis 'Fanny' Jane Taylor b. 19 Feb 1840, d. 25 Dec 1916
Last Edited16 Dec 2006
Note*Robert 'R.C.' Cosby Ennis was born on his parents farm near Brussels,Ontario. He was the eldest of twelve children born to Tom and FannyEnnis. He lived at home and helped with finances until the day he was21. R. C. went to the states and worked for McKenzie and Mann on theNorthern Pacific Railroad which was being built from coast to coast. Heworked for them for three years as a cook. R.C. returned to Ontario andthen went to Neepawa, Manitoba where he started a General Store. Hereturned to Ontario and married Meanue Cox in Listowel, Ontario in 1886.Meanue lived on a farm about two miles from the Ennis farm. The Coxhomestead is still farmed by the Cox family (1979). It was purchasedfrom the Crown in 1864. R.C. and Meanue went to Neepawa to start theirmarried life in a large three story house on First Street. They had four children, Maude born 1887, George 1889, Carl 1893, and Tom1897. Maude died of scarlet fever when she was six years of age, justfive days before her brother, Carl was born. Meanue was very active inChurch work. She was president of the Women's Christian Temperance Unionin Neepawa. After owning the general store for three years, R.C. sold it and built aflour mill which included five acres of land. It was called TheBeautiful Plains Milling Co. He also became the owner of a farmmachinery agency and a lumber yard. He had a grain elevator at Neepawa,Franklin and one in Dauphin. R.C. was on the school board, town council,president of the Turf Club and elected to the Board of Trade, R. C. hiredmen and teams for the Northern Pacific Railway for the Portage-NeepawaBranch in 1899. R.C. was elected as a Liberal M.P. in December 1899. The conservatives paid the bank manager $1,500 to call in R.C.'s$100,000.00 credit note, which forced R.C. to sell out and give up hisnewly elected seat. He sold his implement business in 1899 to theCrawford Co. That same year he sold his lumber business to Messrs. JohnLaw and Arch Cumming. The bank manager lost his job. In the spring of1900 the flour and seed store in Dauphin was destroyed by fire. R.C.salvaged enough money to start a railroad contracting business. In the spring of 1902 he contracted to put in the grades in Manitoba forthe Grand Trunk Pacific and Canadian Northern. He worked near Brandon,Forrest, Russell and Kelwood. He had camps in the winter months at RainyRiver, Riding Mountain and McCreary. 1904 saw him working from Kamsackto Saskatoon, Ross Burn Line and Brookdale-Varcoe Line. 1905 he workedon the grading for the CNR line to Prince Albert and from Virden toHartney. 1906 he worked north of Brandon. In 1906 the Ennis family soldtheir home to M.P. John Crawford. The family spent a year at Forrestbefore moving on to Balcarres, Saskatchewan in 1907. In Saskatchewan he worked on the Grand Trunk (CNR) from Melville toNakomis in 1907. In 1908 he worked from Nakomis west and in 1909 fromMelville to Regina. In the spring of 1910 the family went to homesteadnear Seniac, Saskatchewan. R.C. and sons George and Carl each got halfsection of land. Thomas was too young and had to wait until 1914 to geta half section. George Ennis worked on the railroad with his fathersince 1906. Carl worked on the railroad during 1909. In 1912, R.C. went to La Pas to work on the railroad between there andChurchill. He was walking Boss for McMillan Bros. In 1914 the warbrought work to an end and he returned to the farm, which the boys hadbeen working while he was away. He farmed until he died of stomachcancer in 1925 and is buried in Neepawa, Manitoba. Meanue Ennis lived atthe farm and in 1932, she moved into Macklin to live with her son, Carl,until she died in 1945 at the age of 89. 
Birth*Robert 'R C' Cosby Ennis was born on 15 November 1858 in on the farm near Cranbrook, Ontario, Canada.1 
He was the son of Richard Thomas Ennis and Francis 'Fanny' Jane Taylor
Marriage*Robert 'R C' Cosby Ennis married Meanue Cox on 1 October 1886. In Listowel, Perth County, Ontario, Canada.1 
Death*Robert 'R C' Cosby Ennis died on 13 November 1925, at age 66, in Neepawa, Manitoba, Canada.1 

Children of Robert 'R C' Cosby Ennis and Meanue Cox

Citations

  1. [S1213] Jean Agnes (Ferguson) Smith, Ennis History, Part 2 (: privately published, 1979). Hereinafter cited as Ennis History, Part 2.

Robert Henry 'Bob' Ennis1

M, #47626, b. 1856, d. 3 April 1923
FatherRobert Strain Ennis b. 1833, d. 21 Jun 1908
MotherFrances Elizabeth Wark b. 1830, d. 20 Aug 1896
Last Edited27 Mar 2011
Note*Robert Henry 'Bob' Ennis was second born to Robert Strain and FrancesElizabeth (Wark) Ennis in 1856 in Grey County, Ontario, Canada. It has been said that Bob Ennis joined the 'Transport' during the RielRebellion hauling supplies of food and guns, and ammunition from therailroad to the area where the fighting was taking place, but Bob’sobituary stated that he was chief scout to General Middelton. Bob and his brother, Dave, left Grenfell, Saskatchewan in 1888 for thewest coast. They spent some time in Seattle, Washington (we think) withtheir sister Frances Jane and her husband, Leverett David Coy, butfinally settled in Nanaimo, British Columbia, where they were listed inthe City Directory of 1893, then on to Cumberland, British Columbia, where they were engaged ina construction business for a mining company in 1896 and built somehouses for themselves (see scrapbook). They left there in 1897 toprospect for gold in the Yukon - the year before the stampede to the goldfields. For a full account of their life in the Dawson Gold Fields,refer to his brother Dave for the story. It would seem that Bob and Harriett were married by 1902 because it wasthat year that mining claims started appearing in Mrs. R. H. Ennis’ namein the Gold Creek area. In 1911 Harriett sold all her mining claims andher name appeared in the Vancouver directory of 1912. The story goes thatHarriett didn't’t like living in the north, while Bob had grown to preferthe life there over city life, so they went their separate ways. The Dawson Daily News, 05 March, 1923 states: 'R.H. Ennis of Grenfellwas brought to town Saturday and is in the hospital for treatment. He hasbeen ailing for sometime. He is able to walk around some, but may be inthe hospital for quite a while.' The Dawson Daily News, 03 April, 1923 states: 'Robert Ennis, noted scout,dies in Dawson. Robert H. Ennis, pioneer Klondiker and a notable figurein Northwest Canadian history, died at 9:30 o’clock this morning at St.Mary’s hospital after an illness of several weeks. Mr. Ennis came to theYukon in the early days and for twenty years or more had been engaged in prospecting,mining and hunting in the Klondike. Of late years he had made hisheadquarters at or near Granville fifty miles from Dawson. Mr. Dawsonwas chief scout for General Middleton when he commanded the Dominiontroops in the famous Riel Rebellion, and had many daring and excitingexperiences. The old scout was characterized by a fearlessness and pluckwhich assisted in making a determined fight for life to his last breath. Several weeks ago, Mr. Ennis was taken ill at Granville with troubleoriginating in his toes, and which he thought at first was due tofrostbite. It proved however, when he came to the city and consulted aphysician that he was suffering from dry gangrene , resulting from a forma diabetes which was characterized by poor circulation. This was the cause of the symptomsdeveloping in the toes. The deceased is survived by a widow, who lives in Vancouver and abrother, Dave Ennis, a former Klondike miner now engaged in placer miningin the new Cedar Creek camp in British Columbia. The Brother isunderstood to have exceptionally good ground in the new camp. He lefthere for the outside several years ago. Both brothers came to the Yukonin the rush days from Manitoba, where they were well known. David at some time took an active part in theYukon politics.' Some quotations from the account of the funeral: 'Solemn and impressive service was held yesterday afternoon at Edwardsand Winaut’s Chapel and at the grave side at Pioneer Cemetery as afarewell token of respect and honor to the late Robert H. Ennis. DawsonLodge No. 1 of the Yukon Order of Pioneers attended in a body and manyother friends were present. Beautiful floral tribute were sent by variousones and included a wreath from the Pioneers, a wreath from the membersof the family of the deceased and another from Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Blouin.The pall-bearers were Peter Lenez, J.E. Moskeland, John A. Craig, ThomasA. Darwin, Carl J. Notman and James Tate.' After his death, a telegram was received from Mrs. Ennis in Vancouversaying to bury the remains in Dawson. From the Henderson Directory of British Columbia: Mrs. Bob (R.H.) Enniswas nor listed in Vancouver until 1912. Along with her name is MissGladys Ennis. Gladys (Babe) was adopted. In 1914 they are listed ashaving a confectionery with Miss Gladys Ennis as an assistant. By 1916there was no mention of Gladys’ name and Mrs. R. H. Ennis had a confectionery at adifferent location. In 1923 Harriett had moved again. In 1925 she hadmoved again and still had a confectionery. In 1926 she made her last movebut this time her daughter Gladys was living with her. Harriett die in1939 but Gladys lived at this address until 1942. Since there was no mention of Gladyswith Harriett in 1916, perhaps that was when Gladys married and becameMrs. Gladys Monroe. 'Ennis passed away 17 November, 1939, Mrs. Harriett Ennis, aged 75years, late of 7841 Windsor St., Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Sheleaves to mourn her passing, one daughter, Mrs. Gladys Munroe and threegrandchildren at home. Funeral will be held Monday, November 20, at 1:30 o’clock, from the Chapel of G. W. Hamilton Undertaking Company, Kingswayand Main at 7th. Ave., Vancouver, British Columbia, Rev. H. Berryofficiating, Internment in Forest Lawn Memorial Park,' According toHarriett’s death certificate she was born in New Brunswick, Canada. Gladys was divorced and then married again so maybe that is why her nameis not in the telephone book after 1942. In 1943 their house was owned byH. Hauser. To this date (1979) she has not been located nor any of herthree children. This account is stated in the book - 'Ennis History', privately publishedby Jean Agnes (Ferguson) Smith, 1979. See pages 39 to 42, pictures onpages 38, 39, 40 and see those pictures Bob's scrapbook. The a copy of the letter below is in the possession of Donald R. Coy. Here is a copy of a letter written to Lorainne Clara Handlen McLarty fromSherrie Lynn Halme (Ennis) Hainse, dated June 8, 1994: 3985 Blue BirdRoad, Kelowna, British Columbia, with a carbon copy to Jean Smith. 'Dear Lorainne, I received your address from Jean Smith. I wrote the second half of the'Ennis History' book. I have just recently come across some informationthat I thought you might be interested in. Jennifer Barr, who is aHeritage Consultant, is presently doing the research and organizing ofHistorical Cumberland, British Columbia, Canada. After talking with Jennifer, we soon discovered that Dave and Bob Ennis,who were builders of numerous houses in Cumberland were in fact the sameDave and Bob Ennis mentioned in my Ennis family. Jennifer may write you. I have given her stories on both Bob and DaveEnnis that were in our Ennis History book. She was kind enough tofurnish me with photocopies of what she had discovered in Cumberland. Isee in Bob and Dave’s write ups that you mention Nanaimo, B. C., butthere is no mention of Cumberland. The house at 2757 Maryport Avenue, which stands today was Bob’s house.The front half anyway. The section you can see in the picture (see BobEnnis’ scrapbook) on the right hand side. The 2755 Penrith Avenue homewas built by Dave Ennis. Dave and Bob would buy one lot and split it intwo and build two houses. The two tall houses on the right hand side ofthe picture were built by them. I believe there are others as you canfigure out by the enclosed miscellaneous articles that appeared in theweekly news of Courtnay, Comox, and Cumberland, B.C. Hope this has been of interest to you. I am sending the same informationto Jean Smith. Bye for now, Your cousin, Mrs. D.G.G. Haines (Sherrie Lyne Halme (Ennis) Hainse). Enc. c.c. Jean Smith.' 
Birth*Robert Henry 'Bob' Ennis was born in 1856 in Grey County, Ontario, Canada.1 
He was the son of Robert Strain Ennis and Frances Elizabeth Wark
Event-Misc*Robert Henry 'Bob' Ennis was he left to prospect for gold in Yukon in 1897. 
Marriage*He married Harriet in April 1902. In Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.1 
Death*Robert Henry 'Bob' Ennis died on 3 April 1923, in Dawson City, Yukon Territory, Canada.1 

Family: Robert Henry 'Bob' Ennis and Harriet

Citations

  1. [S935] Jean Agnes (Ferguson) Smith, Ennis History (: Privately Published, 1979). Hereinafter cited as Ennis History.

Robert John 'Jack' 'Johnny' Ennis1

M, #47912, b. 21 March 1890, d. 5 March 1962
FatherJohn 'Jack' Ennis b. 5 Sep 1857, d. 21 Sep 1941
MotherPhoebe Axford b. 30 Dec 1864, d. 8 Jan 1919
Last Edited20 Apr 2017
Birth*Robert John 'Jack' 'Johnny' Ennis was born on 21 March 1890 in Grenfell, Saskatchewan, Canada.1 
He was the son of John 'Jack' Ennis and Phoebe Axford
(Groom) Marriage*Robert John 'Jack' 'Johnny' Ennis married Eleanor Isabell 'Isabel' Hadden on 23 March 1921 in Candiac, Saskatchewan, Canada.1 
Death*Robert John 'Jack' 'Johnny' Ennis died on 5 March 1962, at age 71, in Treherne, Manitoba, Canada.1 
Burial*He was buried in Treherne, Manitoba, Canada.1 

Family: Robert John 'Jack' 'Johnny' Ennis and Eleanor Isabell 'Isabel' Hadden

Citations

  1. [S935] Jean Agnes (Ferguson) Smith, Ennis History (: Privately Published, 1979). Hereinafter cited as Ennis History.

Robert Strain Ennis1

M, #47623, b. 1833, d. 21 June 1908
FatherRobert Ennis
MotherEliza Strain
Last Edited16 Dec 2006
Note*Below is the beginning of the first half of the book, 'Ennis History',privately published in 1979 by Jean Agnes (Ferguson) Smith, 10215 150stApt. 226, Surrey, B.C. V3R 4A8. Standard BOOK no. 0-88925-054-5. Printedand bound by Friesen Printers, 5720 Macleod Trail South, Calgary, AlbertaT2H 0J6, Head Office: Altona, Manitoba, Canada. Acknowledgements (listed on page 2) from Jean Smith: We wish to thank everyone who has helped make this book a possibility,and a treasure to many who will enjoy reading it. We wish to thank our artist, Sandra Dawn (Ennis) Nunn for the pictureon the front cover. Considering that Sandra has never lived on a farm,she has done a super job. And last but not least, the Ennis descendants wish to thank Jean(Ferguson) Smith for the countless hours spent in gathering all thisinformation and pictures, and putting it all together in this book for usall to cherish fondly. .................................................................................................................................................... ..................... Preface of the book, 'Ennis History' 'I believe that as the years roll by, family genealogies and historieswill become more and more valuable. With the passing of the years andthe death of our ancestors, much of our history has been lost toposterity forever, so in the onward flow of years, all that is notrecorded is lost. 'In September of 1974, my mother, Frances 'Fanny Elizabeth (Ennis)Ferguson (listed on page 65 and 67 in the book), mentioned that shealways wanted to make her family tree but didn't know how to go aboutit. It was then that the search began for family statistics. 'The information of recent generations was obtained throughcorrespondence and many personal contacts with living members of thefamily. Earlier family history was pieced together after checkingvarious church and county records, vital statistics, old census reports,library and archives records, county directories, local histories,obituaries, old newspapers, museums, old and new telephone directories,cemetery records, city directories, and etc. 'The pictures in this book have been kindly loaned to us by variousmembers of the family. We hope that they will be of interest and give abetter understanding of our heritage. 'Our book is in two parts. The first part consists of the RobertStrain Ennis genealogy, while part two contains the Tom Ennis genealogy.Although we have not yet been able to prove that Robert Strain and Tomwere brothers, we feel that there is little doubt about it. The storythat has been handed down through the Robert Strain Ennis generations isthat upon arriving in America from Ireland in 1846, one of the four Ennisboys was lost from the rest of his family, never to be heard of afterthat. Tom has also left his descendants with the same story, only in hisversion of it, he was the lost boy. While visiting in Victoria, B.C., Ilooked for Ennis' in the phone book and called the Hal Ennis residence.After explaining the purpose of my call and hearing the story as they hadheard it, there seemed little doubt that the missing link had beenfound. Ennis is not a common name and how could the same story repeatitself in two directions without having started from the same source? 'Our aim has been to trace all known descendants of Robert Strain andTom Ennis. We had also hoped to find the names of Robert Strain'sparents and other brothers or sisters which means that the search for therest of their family has begun. 'Any errors or omissions in the family genealogy are unintentional onthe part of the writer.' The statement above is on page 3 in the book listed above. The writer is Jean Agnes (Ferguson) Smith, whose name and address arelisted above. .................................................................................................................................................... ..................... PART I ENNIS HISTORY Robert Strain and Frances Elizabeth (Wark) Ennis. The story that had been handed down through the years regarding ourforefathers is an interesting but incomplete one. In 1846, our Ennisancestors who left Ireland because of a Potato Famine, crossed theAtlantic in a sailing vessel - a voyage that took six weeks. The parentsand four boys came from the town of Armagh, County Armagh, NorthernIreland. When the boat docked in America, the youngest boy strayed awayand never heard of again (until 1975 a grandchild of that fellow waslocated in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada). At this time, nothing is known about the family from that date until 1854when Robert married Frances in County Grey, Ontario, Canada. Their ninechildren were born between the years 1855 and 1870. In the 1861 Census ofNormandy Township of County Grey, Robert Strain Ennis farmed 100 acreswith 20 of those acres under cultivation and the remainder still inwoodland or wild. The cash value of the farm was $900.00; while the cashvalue of the farm machinery was $ 25.00. He had one heifer, one milchcow, one horse and two pigs making a total cash value of $60.00. It wasinteresting to note that his wheat yielded 13 bushels per acre, his oats20 bushels per acre, and a half acre of potatoes yielded 30 bushels. Hehad made 60 pounds of maple sugar, and 85 pounds of butter in 1860 andhad 300 pounds of pork in a barrel. County Muskoka, Ontario was open for settlement in 1868. By 1871 theywere living on lot 8, concession 11, near Bracebridge, Ontario. They hadbought and sold land in that area in the years 1872, 1875, 1876 and 1878.It is believed that they made their living from the sale of pine lumberwhich was plentiful on their lot. While living at Bracebridge theireldest daughter, Annie, was married to John Lamb and Frances the seconddaughter at the tender age of 18 years, was married to Leverett David Coy. In 1778 they moved westward to Manitoba. Fort Garry, Gladstone, HighBluff and Portage la Prairie are areas where some of the family hadlived. John and Joe took work building the Canadian Pacific Railroad linein Manitoba aiming to reach the homestead lands in the west. By the timethey reached Brandon, excitement was high as settlers were outfittingthemselves for the westward trek. They were afraid to wait any longer forfear that the free land would all be taken, so they quit their jobs withthe CPR and hastened back for their parents and the remainder of thefamily. They then outfitted themselves and headed west. Equipmentrequired by the pioneer homesteader was a yoke of oxen, wagon, walkingplow, axe, shovel, bucksaw and a small stove. Food supplies bought atBrandon were tea, sugar, salt, flour, dried beans, syrup, oatmeal, andsow belly which was very salty dried pork. They then joined the caravan going West. There were scores of ox teamsand wagons on the trail, their rate of progress being influenced to alarge degree, by the number of home steading effects being taken. Sinceall the wagons’ contents had to be unloaded and carried across theswollen streams, a family could spend hours crossing each waterway. Inthis particular group, the women of the party were also carried across.There was one man of about fifty, small of stature though quiteable-bodied, who shrank from getting his feet wet. (He also shank fromall situations where work or discomfort were involved). When everythingelse had been safely transported across the stream, he stood on the bankand asked that they also carry him across the stream. John (Jack) Enniswillingly complied. He picked up his burden and waded bravely out intothe water. About mid-stream he accidentally (?) stumbled, and hispassenger was pitched headlong into the river. It is not clear whether ornot this cured him of his aversion to water, but it isn't’ likely that heasked for any more free transportation. Robert Strain and his wife, Frances Elizabeth (Wark) Ennis homesteaded onthe farm later owned by E. J. Armstrong and now (1970) the home of AlfredWhiteley. The requirements to get a quarter section of land were: $10.00 and tobreak five acres the first year, ten acres each year for three years, tobuild a shanty on it and live there for six months of each year. RobertStrain Ennis, with help of his four sons, Bob, Jack, Dave and Joe, builthis house of logs from the Pipestone hills on N.E. 2-16-8 and named thefarm 'Fair View.' The structure was 12’ x 16’ with one common roomdownstairs and two bedrooms in the attic. That may seem small by to-daysstandards but the pioneer family found room for their oldest daughterAnnie, her husband and four children who came to Grenfell fromBracebridge in February, 1883 to live with the Ennis’ until their homewas built. They also found ample room to hold church services in theirhome whenever there was a student minister in Grenfell. This log housewas used for thirty years so must have been a fine building of its day.In 1888 this piece of land was in Robert Strain Ennis’ son Joe’s name. It is felt that Mrs. Robert Strain Ennis was somewhat disabled in lateryears as an heirloom that is still in the family and is an ordinary chairwith a castor on each leg. The Ennis boys had fashioned it for theirmother - a wheelchair of the 1890 style. For the next several years the Ennis family were busy. A calendar ofevents will make it easier to follow: 1882 - Gilman died. Gilman, a lad of 13 years, had been sickly but diedalong the trail after they left Brandon and was buried along thebanks of some river - presumably the Assiniboine River. - The Robert Strain Ennis family came west to Grenfell,Assiniboia, North West Territory. - They filed their claims for land - John, Dave, Joe andLeverett David Coy. 1883 - Annie (Ennis) Lamb, her husband and four children came toGrenfell. - Grenfell Coy was born - the first white baby born inGrenfell. 1885 - Riel Rebellion. Bob and Dave took part as scouts and on thetransport. The Indians threatened Frances (Ennis) Coy and her infantson Grenfell. 1886 - John (Jack) was married to Phoebe Axford. 1888 - Bob and Dave left for the west coast. 1892 - Frances and Leverett David Coy had moved to Bellingham,Washington, U.S.A. sometime previous to this date. 1894 - August 20. Mr, Lev Coy and family returned from Miniskan,Washington. 1896 - Mrs. R. S. Ennis died. From the files of the Grenfell Sun,August 27, 1896: The funeral of the late Mrs. Ennis lastFriday was largely attended, about sixty-five vehicles being in theprocession. Rev. Mr. J. Hoskins officiated at theGrenfell First Methodist Church and at the grave site. The church, builtof cream-colored local brick and located on Desmond Street North, justeast of the present (1980) United Church. 1897 - Joe was married to Margaret Esther McDonnell and farmed atWolseley, Saskatchewan. Bob and Dave went to the Yukon toprospect for gold. 1899 - Frances Jane (Frank) and Leverett David Coy were back inGrenfell by this time because she was mid-wife forMrs. Joe Ennis (Margaret) when their 2nd born, Etta Lydia Kathleen wasborn. Later that year, Joe, his wife and two smallchildren and his father, Robert Strain Ennis, went West to Alix, N.W.T.to homestead. Esther 'Ettie' was married to Tom Phillips previous to this because the Joe Ennis’ live with her and her husband fortheir first winter at Alix. 1901 - Leverett Coy’s were in Seattle, Washington by this time.Margaret (Madge) spent time with them. 1902 - This was possibly the year that Bob married Harriet. 1905 - Dave came back to Grenfell for his bride-to-be, Barbara PamelaMcDonnell. Madge went back to Dawson with them. RobertStrain Ennis returned from Alix, Alberta to spend his last years betweenthe Annie Lamb and John Ennis homes. He took a stroke while at John’s anddied at the Lambs but the funeral was from John’s house. 1908 - Robert Strain Ennis died. Before his death, he receivednotification that he had inherited an estate inArmagh County, Ireland. It was necessary that he return to Ireland toclaim it but he refused to do that. He said that thetrip over had been so bad that he wouldn't’ chance it again. RobertStrain Ennis was a member of the Orange Lodge and was a director of theGrenfell Agriculture Society in 1888. This account is stated on pages 6 through 9 in the book, - 'EnnisHistory' ,privately published by Jean Agnes (Ferguson) Smith, 1979,Printed and Bound by Frieson Printers, 5720 MacLeod Trail South, T2H 0J6,Head Office: Alton, Manitoba, Canada. Standard Book No. 0-88925-054-5 THE FOLLOWING IS FROM PAGES 11 AND 12 IN THE BOOK, 'GRITAND GROWTH, THE STORY OFGRENFELL' At the time when the failure of the potato crop reduced the Irish peopleto near starvation (1846), the Ennis family had emigrated to Canada, andsettled in Ontario. The early 1880's found them in Gladstone, Manitoba.The boys, Jack and Joe, went to work on the Canadian Pacific Railroadwhich was being built through Manitoba, their ultimate objective being toreach the homestead lands of the West. By the time they reached Brandon,there was a great bustle of excitement, as eager settlers outfittedthemselves for the westward trail, and they were afraid that if theywaited until the railroad reached the territory, all the free land wouldbe taken. So they severed their connections with the construction crewand went back for their parents Mr. and Mrs. R. S. Ennis, and the restof the family. They bought oxen and wagons and joined the caravan goingWest. There were scores of ox teams and wagons on the trail, their rate ofprogress being influenced to a large degree, by the number of homesteading effects being taken. Since all the wagons' contents had to beunloaded and carried across the swollen streams, a family could spendhours crossing each waterway. In this particular group, the women of theparty were also carried across. There was one man of about fifty, smallof stature though quite able-bodied, who shrank from getting his feetwet. (He also shrank from all situations where work or discomfort wereinvolved). When everything else had been safely transported across thestream. he stood on the bank and asked that they also carry him across.Jack Ennis willingly complied. He pick up his burden and waded bravelyout into the water. About mid-stream he accidentally (?) stumbled, andhis passenger was pitched headlong into the river. We aren't toldwhether or not this cured him of his aversion to water, but it isn'tlikely that he asked for any more free transportation. Mr. and Mrs. Robert Strain and his wife, Frances (Wauk) Ennis homesteadedon the farm later owned by E. B. Armstrong and now the home of AlfredWhitely (1980). Church services were held at Mr. Ennis' home in theearly days. Jack Ennis settled on N.W. 10-16-8. His marriage to Miss P. Axford wasone of the early ones of the district, and was performed by Rev. JohnFotheringham. The oldest son, Frank, was a blacksmith in Grenfell for awhile, and later took up land near Peeples. The homestead and adjoiningland was farmed for some years after Mr. Ennis retirement, by his sonNelson, who became well known as a breeder of Herford cattle. It waslater farmed by his grandson, Donald. The Ennis' two daughters, Frances'Fanny' (Mrs. W. J. Ferguson), and Olive (Mrs. John Warwick) have maderecords that are worthy of note. Mrs. Ferguson began exhibiting at the Grenfell Agricultural Fair in 1910,when she entered a print dress and baking powder biscuits. She has beenwinning prizes in Grenfell ever since, and in looking for new fields toconquer, has exhibited work at Broadview, Regina, Prince Albert,Saskatoon, Abernethy, and the C. N. E. Toronto, where she had outstandingsuccess. Her work includes baking, canning, embroidering, needle point,and all types of fine needle work, knitting, making quilts, mats,painting on fabric, and on canvas. Her hobbies, which she shares with her husband, includes making lamps,bowls and other novelties from local diamond willow and oddities gatheredfrom root piles and lake shores; pictures made from birch bark and moss;and lapidary work, making use of prairie Pebbles (polished) forornamental lamp bases, door stops and table tops Mrs. Ferguson's latest triumph has been in Drawn Thread work, a form ofembroidery dating back to the 16th century. A competition was sponsoredby the F. W. I. of Canada in the Tweedsmuir Handicraft section. FannyFerguson has has won first prize in the district and provincial exhibits,and her work is now entered in the National exhibit at Guelph. In the range and excellence of her work she reflects the spirit of herpioneer parents, John 'Jack' And Phoebe (Axford) Ferguson, who foundnothing too difficult to tackle and who always said, 'if a thing is worthdoing, it is worth doing well.' The same spirit has contributed to the success of her sister, MargaretOlivia 'Ollie' (Ennis) Warwick, who has been a consistent winner in localfairs over the years. In 1965 she sent four of her oil paintings to theToronto Exhibition for appraisal. She was very gratified to learn thatshe had won three prizes, two firsts and a third. One of these was inthe sixty-five years and over class, and the other two were in opencompletion. Ollie started painting in 1962 as a hobby, and has showndecided talent. The following was written by C. J. L. Bushe, B.A., M.B. the lateSurgeon-Major Army Medical Staff, Canada, in 1980 and is stated on pages118 and 119 in the book, 'Grit and Growth, the story of Grenfell', byAnnie I. Yule and privately published by the Grenfell HistoricalCommittee, printed by Brigdens, covers by Universal Bindery, Saskatoon,Saskatchewan, Canada. 'GRENFELL, ASSINIBOIA, AS A FIELD FOR IMMIGRATION Canada has suffered much of late years in public estimation, and thereason is not far to seek. When the Canadian Pacific Railway firstopened up the vast interior to the settlers there followed a blowing oftrumpets and an amount of tall talk that we should have smiled at ifheard among our cousins south of the boundary. This was accomplished bya cloud of immigration pamphlets and 'dodgers' describing such a futureas no country on earth can, or will offer. The estimation returns on agricultural enterprise were absurd, and thetheoretical prices for farm produce was calculated on a similar basis.The farmer had only to sow, reap and grow rich. Then followed a rushfrom the older part of the Dominion and the United Kingdom, a largeproportion consisting of 'dead beats' of every class of society. Many ofthem had just enough money to demoralize them. These latter, on thestrength of possessing a couple of thousand pounds, attempted the life ofan English gentleman farmer on a capital with which they never have madesuch a venture elsewhere or the habits to fit them for such a life. As anatural result there is not a district along the railway line in whichwell-built houses and farm buildings may not be seen, the former ownersof which are scattered to all four points of the compass, and there ishardly a middle-class family in England to whose minds the name Canadadoes not recall failure of some relative. This state of things reachedan acute stage in the yeas 1894-1895, when not only were the crops muchbelow the average in equality, but also in the latter year, frozen aswell; added to which, wheat fell to the lowest price on record, and stockand horses depreciated in value to a corresponding degree. The people inthe Northwest then found themselves in the position that they had todepend on a price of wheat as regulated between Liverpool and WallStreet, selling in the open markets of the world, and obliged totransport their produce, for that purpose across half a continent as wellas the Atlantic Ocean, and at the same time they were bringing theirnecessities from outside under highest tariffs that exist. It speaks volumes for the country that in spite of these drawbacks it hasbeen steadily advancing as a whole in spite of individual failures. Thecountry has now survived the periods of inflated expectation andspeculation, and the natural reaction of disappointment and depression,and has practically settled down on a solid business foundation. In addition our market is coming to us, not slowly but by leaps andbounds: the country surrounding us, east, west and north abounds withcoal and minerals; the rush now is after gold, which may be a source ofimmediate gain, but the real future of the country lies in the iron,lead, and coal, and the populations who will have to work these mineswill have to be fed from our fields and herds. Times have been hard on the pioneers, but the blame cannot fairy be laidon the country, it is sound to the core, the methods were wrong and toomuch was expected at first. It is with some hope of rectifying thisprevailing public opinion that I now write. There is one class inparticular to whom I would address myself and point out the advantages ofthe Northwest, and that is the class of retired officers who are nowscraping along on small means and spending sleepless nights in thinkinghow to provide for their sons. The expenses of a preparation forSandhurst or Woolwich and the necessary disappointment of the majority inthe overcrowding of the profession is an old and bitter cry among theseancient warriors. I would therefore, show one opening for those who donot fear to avail themselves of it. Those who have spent their mostactive years on foreign service feel 'cramped, cabined and confined' whensettled down on a small income 'en retraite' in the United Kingdom, andit seems hard that the boys have to get out and away just at the timewhen their parents feel the want of their company. To these I would say:'Why not come out here?' Land can still be bought for a song, theexpenses or living are low, there are plenty of people of your own class,and there might be more. I purpose to give a plain, unvarnishedstatement herein of the life and prospects, and if the reader isdisappointed at the lack of exciting detail I would forewarn him thatnothing is set down which has not come within the scope of my ownpersonal observation. The first objection that will probably be raised is the climate: that thecold is very severe at times cannot be denied, but after the experiencederived from eight winters' residence I can truly state that I do notconsider the winters by any means unpleasant on the whole; the air is sodry that the Chilly dampness of the English is quite missing, and thehouses being warmed on a different plan, are incomparably morecomfortable in temperature than English homes in winter, no matter whatthe wether may be outside. The winter days are usually bright andsunshiny, with a blue sky overhead and an ordinary tweed suit is quitewarm enough for walking about in. When driving, particularly at night,furs are, of course, absolutely necessary, but in other respects ordinarywinter clothes are ample. The snow thaws about the beginning of April, and the interval betweenwinter and summer is briefest. The weather rapidly gets warmer, July andAugust being the hottest months, during which the thermometer may run upto 86 to 90 degrees Fahrenheit in the shade, but nights are cool andrefreshing. September and October are the best months in the year, thedays being bright and clear, with a crispness in the air, and the leaveson the trees every shade of yellow and scarlet. The snow begins again inNovember, as a rule, although some winters the ground is bare untilChristmas. For healthfulness the climate is unsurpassed. Bronchitis and pneumoniaare practically unknown and former residence in hot climates, such asIndia, etc. does not appear to have any unfavorable influence; indeed thecontrary. Any family in possession of a certain income of £ 250 and £400 a year would be looked on as rich, and could, by taking up landeither by purchase or homestead (the regulations regarding which can beobtained from the office of the High Commissioner, Victoria Street,Westminster) with two or three sons, make a home which would be yearlyrising in value as the price of land and property appreciates. Alreadythe tide has turned and the last two years have seen a steady rise in thevalue of real estate, which is certain to continue as the country fillsup. For those who are fond of sport, there is an unlimited field amongducks, prairie chickens, geese, etc. and a healthy outdoor life, withabundance of plain wholesome fare.' As stated above, this statement was written by C. J. L. Bushe, B.A.,M.B. late Surgeon-Major Army Medical Staff and is found on pages 118 and119 in the book, 'Grit and Growth, the story of Grenfell', by Annie I.Yule and privately published by the Grenfell Historical Committee, 1980and printed by Brigdens and the covers by Universal Bindery, Saskatoon,Saskatchewan, Canada. 
Birth*Robert Strain Ennis was born in 1833 in Armagh, Northern Ireland.2 
He was the son of Robert Ennis and Eliza Strain
Marriage*Robert Strain Ennis married Frances Elizabeth Wark in 1854. In Normandy Township, Grey County, Ontario, Canada.1 
Death*Robert Strain Ennis died on 21 June 1908, in Summerberry, Saskatchewan, Canada; Stroke.1 
Burial*He was buried in Summerberry Cemetery, Saskatchewan, Canada.1 

Children of Robert Strain Ennis and Frances Elizabeth Wark

Citations

  1. [S935] Jean Agnes (Ferguson) Smith, Ennis History (: Privately Published, 1979). Hereinafter cited as Ennis History.
  2. [S936] Jean Agnes (Ferguson) Smith, "Compiled Records of Jean Agnes (Ferguson) Smith, author of 'Ennis History'" (10215 150 St. Apt. 226, Surrey, B.C., Canada). . Hereinafter cited as "Compiled Records of Jean Agnes (Ferguson) Smith, author of 'Ennis History.'"

Robert Strain Ennis1

M, #47755, b. 30 December 1908, d. 8 April 1972
FatherDavid 'Dave' Ennis b. 20 Oct 1859, d. 4 Aug 1937
MotherBarbara Pamelia McDonell b. 2 Feb 1878, d. 24 Jan 1953
Last Edited16 Dec 2006
Birth*Robert Strain Ennis was born on 30 December 1908 in Dawson City, YukonTerritory, Canada.1 
He was the son of David 'Dave' Ennis and Barbara Pamelia McDonell
Marriage*Robert Strain Ennis married Grace Marie McLeod on 8 July 1935. In Grand Forks, British Columbia, Canada.1 
Death*Robert Strain Ennis died on 8 April 1972, at age 63, in Surrey, British Columbia, Canada.1 

Family: Robert Strain Ennis and Grace Marie McLeod

Citations

  1. [S935] Jean Agnes (Ferguson) Smith, Ennis History (: Privately Published, 1979). Hereinafter cited as Ennis History.

Robert Strain Ennis1

M, #59921
FatherMoses Ennis
MotherMary
Last Edited24 Jan 2002
Robert Strain Ennis was the son of Moses Ennis and Mary
Marriage*Robert Strain Ennis married Elizabeth Shouldice, daughter of Christopher Shouldice and Jane

Child of Robert Strain Ennis and Elizabeth Shouldice

Citations

  1. [S1038] Sherrie Lyne (Ennis) Halme Haines, "Sherrie Lyne (Ennis) Halme Haines, compiled records" . . Hereinafter cited as "Sherrie Lyne (Ennis) Halme Haines, compiled records."

Sally Ennis1,2

F, #76248, b. 1819, d. 1863
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Birth*Sally Ennis was born in 1819. 
Marriage*She married Isaac Fenner Potter, son of Samuel J Potter and Ann Nancy Segar, in February 1839.2 
Death*Sally Ennis died in 1863, in Cranston, Providence County, Rhode Island

Child of Sally Ennis and Isaac Fenner Potter

Citations

  1. [S1398] , vol.15, Daughters of the American Revolution Lineage Books, 152 vols., online Ancestry.com. Previously published in hard copy (Provo, Utah, U.S.A.: The Generations Network, Inc.). Hereinafter cited as "Daughters of the American Revolution Lineage Books."
  2. [S1516] Charles Edward Potter, Genealogies of the Potter Families (Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A.: Alfred Mudge & Son, Printers, 1888), Part 4, Page 3. Hereinafter cited as Genealogies of the Potter Families.

Scott Wlliam Ennis1

M, #59153, b. 15 March 1958, d. 11 May 1973
Last Edited24 Jan 2002
Birth*Scott Wlliam Ennis was born on 15 March 1958.1 
Death*He died on 11 May 1973, at age 15.1 

Citations

  1. [S1213] Jean Agnes (Ferguson) Smith, Ennis History, Part 2 (: privately published, 1979). Hereinafter cited as Ennis History, Part 2.

Stanley James Ennis1

M, #48272, b. 9 March 1918, d. 6 April 1977
FatherJoseph William 'Joe' Ennis b. 24 Feb 1865, d. 10 Jan 1947
MotherMargaret Esther 'Maggie' McDonell b. 17 Dec 1875, d. 28 Jan 1965
Last Edited19 Apr 2017
Name-ComStanley James Ennis is commonly known as Stan Ennis.1 
Note*Stan also tried out the farming game but like the other three, left it for greener fields. He worked in automotives and then as a security guard at Battle River Station, Forestburg, Alberta. 
Birth*He was born on 9 March 1918 in Alix, Alberta, Canada.1 
He was the son of Joseph William 'Joe' Ennis and Margaret Esther 'Maggie' McDonell
Death*Stanley James Ennis died on 6 April 1977, at age 59, in Camrose, Alberta, Canada.1 

Citations

  1. [S935] Jean Agnes (Ferguson) Smith, Ennis History (: Privately Published, 1979). Hereinafter cited as Ennis History.

Susan Margaret Ennis1

F, #58626, b. 8 October 1860, d. 7 January 1926
FatherRichard Thomas Ennis b. 1834, d. 30 Jul 1925
MotherFrancis 'Fanny' Jane Taylor b. 19 Feb 1840, d. 25 Dec 1916
Last Edited24 Jan 2002
Note*Susan was the second child born to Tom and Fanny Ennis on their farm nearCranbrook, Ontario. Susan married Jacob Long and raised a family ofnine children, the last two being twins. Jacob's parents last name wasLang, but he change his last name to Long. Note: Cranbrook is no longer atown, it was probably absorbed by the city of Brussels, Ontario, perSherrie Lyne (Ennis) Halme Haines, author of the second half of 'EnnisHistory' per phone call to Donald Raymond Coy, January 4th, 1999. Susan and Jacob had a Hotel at Cranbrook, Ontario. Susan took care ofher father, after her mother died. Thomas Ennis died in 1925, the sameyear as his first born, Robert Cosby Ennis. Susan died the followingyear in 1926. 
Marriage*Susan Margaret Ennis married Jacob Long on 14 January. 
Birth*Susan Margaret Ennis was born on 8 October 1860 in on the farm near Cranbrook, Ontario, Canada.1 
She was the daughter of Richard Thomas Ennis and Francis 'Fanny' Jane Taylor
Death*Susan Margaret Ennis died on 7 January 1926, at age 65, in Atwood, Perth County, Ontario, Canada.1 

Children of Susan Margaret Ennis and Jacob Long

Citations

  1. [S1213] Jean Agnes (Ferguson) Smith, Ennis History, Part 2 (: privately published, 1979). Hereinafter cited as Ennis History, Part 2.

Sydney Melville Ennis1

M, #58631, b. 6 May 1872, d. 4 July 1950
FatherRichard Thomas Ennis b. 1834, d. 30 Jul 1925
MotherFrancis 'Fanny' Jane Taylor b. 19 Feb 1840, d. 25 Dec 1916
Last Edited24 Jan 2002
Birth*Sydney Melville Ennis was born on 6 May 1872 in on the farm near Cranbrook, Ontario, Canada.1 
He was the son of Richard Thomas Ennis and Francis 'Fanny' Jane Taylor
Marriage*Sydney Melville Ennis married Elizabeth 'Lizzie' Gourlay on 2 August 1900. In Brandon, Manitoba, Canada.1 
Death*Sydney Melville Ennis died on 4 July 1950, at age 78, in Kelwood, Manitoba, Canada.1 

Children of Sydney Melville Ennis and Elizabeth 'Lizzie' Gourlay

Citations

  1. [S1213] Jean Agnes (Ferguson) Smith, Ennis History, Part 2 (: privately published, 1979). Hereinafter cited as Ennis History, Part 2.

Thomas 'Tom' Leslie Ennis1

M, #58638, b. 27 January 1897
FatherRobert 'R C' Cosby Ennis b. 15 Nov 1858, d. 13 Nov 1925
MotherMeanue Cox b. 25 Sep 1856, d. 16 Jul 1945
Last Edited24 Jan 2002
Note*Thomas 'Tom' Leslie Ennis was the fourth child born to Robert Cosby andMeanue (Cox) Ennis in Neepawa, Manitoba in the year 1897. When Tom waseleven months old his mother took him and his brothers, George and Cal,to Brussels, Ontario on December 21, 1898 on the excursion train to visithis maternal and paternal grandparents. In June, 1906 the family moved to Forrest, Manitoba for the summer whereR.C. was working on the Grand Trunk Railroad. In May, 1906 Tom and hismother, Meanue, travelled by train to Vancouver, British Columbia tovisit George Cox, Meanue's brother. The family moved in June, 1907 to Balcarres, Saskatchewan as R.C.'s workwith the railroad construction business progressed westward. In 1910 thefamily took up homesteads in the Senlac area. In the spring of 1922 Tommarried Lula Myrle Barnes, born in Grand Rapids, Michigan in the year1900. At the age of twelve, Lula came to the Senlac area with herparents, Clyde and Catherine Barnes who took up homesteading. Lulaworked as a telephone operator in Senlac. Tom and Lula farmed Section 5,Tp. 40. R. 25, W3M after they were married. They raised registered Clydesdale horses. In December, 1940 their son,Harold, moved west to Victoria to work on a farm. In the spring of 1941Tom, Lula, and their three daughters, Evelyn, Helen and Ethel moved toSaannichton, British Columbia, which is just north of Victoria, B.C. andrented a house. Tom worked in construction on the Patricia Bay Airport. In 1943 they purchased a home and fifty acres in the Cobble Hill area,which is about 68 miles north of Victoria, where Tom worked in the forestindustry. After retiring in 1963 they moved to Victoria. 
Birth*Thomas 'Tom' Leslie Ennis was born on 27 January 1897 in Neepawa, Manitoba, Canada.1 
He was the son of Robert 'R C' Cosby Ennis and Meanue Cox
Marriage*Thomas 'Tom' Leslie Ennis married Lula Myrle Barnes, daughter of Clyde Barnes and Catherine, on 8 March 1922. In Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.1 

Family: Thomas 'Tom' Leslie Ennis and Lula Myrle Barnes

Citations

  1. [S1213] Jean Agnes (Ferguson) Smith, Ennis History, Part 2 (: privately published, 1979). Hereinafter cited as Ennis History, Part 2.

Victor Burton 'Vic' Ennis1

M, #47914, b. 23 October 1894, d. 22 August 1974
FatherJohn 'Jack' Ennis b. 5 Sep 1857, d. 21 Sep 1941
MotherPhoebe Axford b. 30 Dec 1864, d. 8 Jan 1919
Last Edited7 Mar 2007
Biographical Note* Victor Burton Ennis was born on the 23rd of October, 1894 at his parents'farm. He attended Summerhill School until 1903 when Wolf Hill wasopened. After he left school he stayed on the farm and helped his Father. Vic also enjoyed doing little jobs around the house. One time he evenattempted baking bread while his Mother was out. He soon learned thateven if the flour is a bit cold, he could not warm it up in the pan onthe stove. In 1915, he bought land from his father. With his Dad's help, he wasable to build a house and barn the same year. A year later he movedinto his new house, and his sister Ollie kept house for him until he andMuriel were married in July 1917. On June 23, 1918, Vic was conscripted into the army, being stationed inRegina. He would come home on leave to do the fall work. Muriel wasvery lonely on the farm alone, so took their 4 cows, 1 sow and 10 littlepigs, the hens and 1 horse and moved to her parents' farm. At harvesttime Vic was given time to come to take the crop off. With extensions onhis leave, Armistice was signed before he had to go back. Only 6 dayslater their first child was born. In Vic's early farming days, all field work was done with horses. Helater owned a Titan tractor which he used to break up more land. A fewyears later, he traded a team of horses for a rubber-tired tractor. Nowthat was quite an improvement! Vic and his brother, Nels, bought thefirst combine in the district in 1938. They got the telephone on the farmin 1921. Vic was very handy at making things. In 1922 he trapped enough muskratsand bought a kit from Eaton's to make his first radio. He made severalafter that and sold them. He was good at repairing machinery. Manyneighbors brought the tractors, cars, etc. for him to over haul. Beforethe hydro days, Vic wired the house and barn for lights run offbatteries, and fixed up a windmill to charge the batteries. In 1947, Vic and Muriel sold their farm and moved to Regina where he and2 of his sons, Verne and Al, bought a woodworking shop. There wasn'tenough business to support 3 families, so Al later went to workelsewhere. This shop was sold in 1956. Then Vic and Verne built boatsuntil Vic retired in 1960, and Verne moved to Ontario. In 1965 they sold the house in Regina. Vic and Muriel then spent a yearin Calgary with their youngest daughter, Joyce, and her family. InAugust 1966 they moved back to Grenfell. Vic passed away in 1974.Muriel is now (1979) living in a unit at the senior citizens' home there,and keeps very active. This account is found on pages 59 and 60 in the book, 'Ennis History',published in 1979 by Jean Agnes (Ferguson) Smith. 
Birth*Victor Burton 'Vic' Ennis was born on 23 October 1894 in Grenfell, Saskatchewan, Canada.1 
He was the son of John 'Jack' Ennis and Phoebe Axford
Marriage*Victor Burton 'Vic' Ennis married Laura Muriel 'Muriel' Rogers, daughter of Thomas Wettenhall Rogers and Agnes Annabella Fotheringham, on 11 July 1917. In Grenfell, Saskatchewan, Canada.1 
Death*Victor Burton 'Vic' Ennis died on 22 August 1974, at age 79, in Grenfell, Saskatchewan, Canada.1 
Burial*He was buried in Summerberry Cemetery, Grenfell, Saskatchewan, Canada

Family: Victor Burton 'Vic' Ennis and Laura Muriel 'Muriel' Rogers

Citations

  1. [S935] Jean Agnes (Ferguson) Smith, Ennis History (: Privately Published, 1979). Hereinafter cited as Ennis History.

Viola Minerva Ennis1

F, #59081, b. 21 July 1907, d. 9 June 1993
FatherWilliam 'Will' Thomas Ennis b. 15 Jan 1879, d. 28 Apr 1966
MotherHattie Matilda Larson b. 6 Jan 1887, d. 10 Aug 1966
Last Edited26 Dec 2013
Name-ComViola Minerva Ennis is commonly known as Viola.2 
Birth*She was born on 21 July 1907 in Rupert, Minidoka County, Idaho, U.S.A..1 
She was the daughter of William 'Will' Thomas Ennis and Hattie Matilda Larson
Marriage*Viola Minerva Ennis married Worley N. Head on 31 August 1929. In Kemmer, Lincoln County, Wyoming, U.S.A..1 
Death*Viola Minerva Ennis died on 9 June 1993, at age 85.2 

Child of Viola Minerva Ennis and Worley N. Head

Citations

  1. [S1213] Jean Agnes (Ferguson) Smith, Ennis History, Part 2 (: privately published, 1979). Hereinafter cited as Ennis History, Part 2.
  2. [S8665] Personal correspondence, with Lynne (Head) Geis . Personal Archives of David Arthur Walker (Edwards, Ontario, Canada).

William Ennis1

M, #49158, b. 1825
FatherRobert Ennis
MotherEliza Strain
Last Edited10 Apr 2011
Note*William lived across the road from Robert Strain Ennis at Bracebridge, Muskoka County, Ontario and in an old letter to the McFarlins referred to Robert Strain Ennis as uncle Bob. At this time William's spouse is a Miss Esther and it is not known whether they had children. William could be a brother to Robert Strain Ennis, who married Frances Wark, according to Jean Agnes (nee Ferguson) Smith, publisher of ENNIS HISTORY; she believes he is. See 'ENNIS HISTORY', by Jean Agnes (nee Ferguson) Smith, published 1979 page124. From: 'Sherrie Haines' Subject: McFarlin Family Sent: Friday, January 15, 1999 10:52 PM To: Donald Coy Hello Don, To answer your question: see page 123 'Aunt Maggie Ford' you can add the following information to what was on pages 123 & 124: In 1851 Robert Strain Ennis was living with Robert Ennis, widower. Also living with Robert Ennis was: William Ennis, Joseph Ennis, Ann Jane Ennis, Margaret Ennis, Elizabeth Ennis with one member of the family absent - that was Robert Ennis Jr. Robert Ennis, widower - his wife was Eliza Strain. William Ennis - who married Esther and lived eventually in Bracebridge, Ont. Joseph Ennis - don't know what happened to him. Ann Jane 'Nancy' Ennis married Thomas Musson Wright. Margaret Phedora 'Maggie' Ennis married Henry Ford. Elizabeth Ennis married Henry McFarlin. Bye for now, Sherrie E-mail: Sherrie Lyne Halme(Ennis) Haines, 4863 Cordova Bay Road, Victoria, B.C. Canada V8Y 2J9. 
Birth*William Ennis was born in 1825 in Ireland
He was the son of Robert Ennis and Eliza Strain

Citations

  1. [S935] Jean Agnes (Ferguson) Smith, Ennis History (: Privately Published, 1979). Hereinafter cited as Ennis History.

William 'Carl' Carl Ennis1

M, #58637, b. 20 February 1893, d. 18 October 1964
FatherRobert 'R C' Cosby Ennis b. 15 Nov 1858, d. 13 Nov 1925
MotherMeanue Cox b. 25 Sep 1856, d. 16 Jul 1945
Last Edited24 Jan 2002
Note*William Carl 'Carl' Ennis was born in Neepawa, Manitoba in 1893, thethird child born to R. C. and Meanue Ennis. Cal's sister, Maude, diedjust five days before he was born. Carl left Neepawa with his parents in1906. They lived in Forrest, Manitoba for a short time before moving onto Balcarres, Saskatchewan until they took up homesteads near Senlac,Saskatchewan in 1910. Carl worked with his father on the railroad for ayear or two before they went farming. He had a half section of land andfarmed it until 1929. He decided to go to Edmonton and learn embalmingand funeral arranging. Carl apprenticed for a year to learn the businessbefore returning to Macklin, Saskatchewan to start his own undertakingbusiness. He stayed in business until a couple of years before his death. Carl never married, but his mother, Meanue Ennis and her sister HattieCox, lived with him from 1932 until they died. 
Birth*William 'Carl' Carl Ennis was born on 20 February 1893 in Neepawa, Manitoba, Canada.1 
He was the son of Robert 'R C' Cosby Ennis and Meanue Cox
Death*William 'Carl' Carl Ennis died on 18 October 1964, at age 71, in Macklin, Saskatchewan, Canada.1 

Citations

  1. [S1213] Jean Agnes (Ferguson) Smith, Ennis History, Part 2 (: privately published, 1979). Hereinafter cited as Ennis History, Part 2.

William 'Will' Thomas Ennis1

M, #58634, b. 15 January 1879, d. 28 April 1966
FatherRichard Thomas Ennis b. 1834, d. 30 Jul 1925
MotherFrancis 'Fanny' Jane Taylor b. 19 Feb 1840, d. 25 Dec 1916
Last Edited24 Jan 2002
Note*William 'Will' Thomas Ennis was the tenth child born to Tom and FannyEnnis on their farm near Cranbrook, Ontario. Will moved to Idaho when hewas twenty-three. On November 16, 1904 Will married Hattie MatildaLarson in Pocatello, Idaho. Will worked for the Union Pacific Railroadfor awhile and later homesteaded a ranch in Minidoka county and was infarming and livestock. Hattie and Will raised a family of four boys andtwo girls. They lived in Bellevue, Idaho from 1930 to 1942. In 1942Hattie and Will operated a rooming house in Rupert, Idaho until theyretired to a residence. 
Birth*William 'Will' Thomas Ennis was born on 15 January 1879 in on the farm near Cranbrook, Ontario, Canada.1 
He was the son of Richard Thomas Ennis and Francis 'Fanny' Jane Taylor
Marriage*William 'Will' Thomas Ennis married Hattie Matilda Larson on 16 November 1904. In Pocatello, Bannock County, U.S.A..1 
Death*William 'Will' Thomas Ennis died on 28 April 1966, at age 87, in Rupert, Minidoka County, Idaho, U.S.A..1 

Children of William 'Will' Thomas Ennis and Hattie Matilda Larson

Citations

  1. [S1213] Jean Agnes (Ferguson) Smith, Ennis History, Part 2 (: privately published, 1979). Hereinafter cited as Ennis History, Part 2.

William Cosby Ennis1

M, #59100, b. 14 December 1911
FatherFrederick Athol Ennis b. 12 Jan 1881, d. 19 Sep 1951
MotherEthel Sarah Wilson b. 11 Sep 1884, d. 16 Nov 1964
Last Edited24 Jan 2002
Birth*William Cosby Ennis was born on 14 December 1911 in Brussels, Huron County, Ontario, Canada.1 
He was the son of Frederick Athol Ennis and Ethel Sarah Wilson

Citations

  1. [S1213] Jean Agnes (Ferguson) Smith, Ennis History, Part 2 (: privately published, 1979). Hereinafter cited as Ennis History, Part 2.

William Edgar Ennis1

M, #59067, b. March 1905, d. 12 August 1905
FatherJoseph 'Joe' Morden Ennis b. 16 Mar 1874, d. 3 Jun 1911
MotherMartha Aveline 'Avie' Galloway b. 26 Jun 1874, d. 25 Oct 1966
Last Edited19 Mar 2011
Birth*William Edgar Ennis was born in March 1905 in Neepawa, Manitoba, Canada.1 
He was the son of Joseph 'Joe' Morden Ennis and Martha Aveline 'Avie' Galloway
Death*William Edgar Ennis died on 12 August 1905, in Neepawa, Manitoba, Canada.1 
Burial*He was buried in Neepawa, Manitoba, Canada

Citations

  1. [S1213] Jean Agnes (Ferguson) Smith, Ennis History, Part 2 (: privately published, 1979). Hereinafter cited as Ennis History, Part 2.

William Franklin Glenn 'Frank' Ennis1

M, #47910, b. 28 January 1887, d. 16 March 1975
FatherJohn 'Jack' Ennis b. 5 Sep 1857, d. 21 Sep 1941
MotherPhoebe Axford b. 30 Dec 1864, d. 8 Jan 1919
Last Edited19 Mar 2011
Birth*William Franklin Glenn 'Frank' Ennis was born on 28 January 1887 in Grenfell, Saskatchewan, Canada.1 
He was the son of John 'Jack' Ennis and Phoebe Axford
Note*William Franklin 'Frank' Glen Ennis got his first paying job in 1907, helping build the Wolseley-Reston railway line. Each employee had to supply his own team of horses and his own sleeping quarters. Frank and his Dad built a mini cabin 6' X 10' from scrap lumber and put it on skids. With the railway completed, the village of Baring, Sask. sprang up in 1909. Being handy at working with metal, Frank started a blacksmith shop in Baring. He later moved to Grenfell where business was a little more inviting. Frank always had the desire the invent things from cast-off materials. In 1913 he built a car from scraps he could find, and when he cranked it up one day, it started like a charm! From the picture in his scrapbook you will notice that there are no frills. A car seat bolted to an old buggy frame and a few other bare necessities. It didn't even have floor boards in it, so when he took his cousin, Ellen McDonell, for a ride, her long skirt got caught in the drive shaft. When they got to Ellen's aunt's house, Ellen had to back up into the house because she was missing the back of her skirt. As this incident repeated itself, Frank and his car weren't too popular with the girls! From 1915 to June 1919, Frank served in the Canadian Army overseas. When he returned from overseas, he farmed at Glenavon with his brother, Johnny, until 1925 when he bought his own land. Frank and his mail-order bride, Maude, moved to their new home on the farm. One partner answered the other's lonely ad in the paper and they corresponded for a while before they actually met in person. Maude had the most beautiful dark red hair as a a young girl and as she was telling us, in one of her letters to Frank, she told him that she had something to tell him but that she was afraid that it would ruin their relationship so she'd only tell him in her next letter for fear that she wouldn't hear from him again. Curiosity got the best of Frank and he replied by return mail. Maude sat down and wrote the tragic news that she was a red-head. Now with glitter in her eyes, Maude told us that again Frank replied by return mail to inform her that he would love her all the more for it. Frank and Maude's union was blessed with a son, Ralph. Many a story Frank has told us about the hardships of the depression years, but he always seemed to see a funny side to them. When one-way discs were the latest in farm implements, he built one from scrap metal he had lying around the yard. In 1953, Frank and Maude retired to a house he had built in Glenavon.Their son, Ralph took over the farm. Frank kept himself busy making tables, lamps, and numerous other articles from diamond willow and caraganas. After Frank passed away, Maude lived in their little house for a few years but now (1979) she has her little unit in the Senior Citizens home in Glenavon. 
Marriage*William Franklin Glenn 'Frank' Ennis married Maude Amelia Crowell on 22 December 1926. In Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.1 
Death*William Franklin Glenn 'Frank' Ennis died on 16 March 1975, at age 88, in Glenavon, Saskatchewan, Canada.1 
Burial*He was buried in Glenavon, Saskatchewan, Canada.1 

Family: William Franklin Glenn 'Frank' Ennis and Maude Amelia Crowell

Citations

  1. [S935] Jean Agnes (Ferguson) Smith, Ennis History (: Privately Published, 1979). Hereinafter cited as Ennis History.

Harriet Mateldia Eno1

F, #112864, b. circa 1883
ChartsDescendants of David Walker & Margaret Hetherington
Last Edited13 Aug 2020
Birth*Harriet Mateldia Eno was born circa 1883 in Ontario, Canada.2 
Marriage*She married William Gordon Small, son of William Small and Adelaide Georgina Tanton, on 1 September 1913. In New Westminster, British Columbia, Canada.1 

Family: Harriet Mateldia Eno and William Gordon Small

Citations

  1. [S15677] William Gordon Small & Harriet Mateldia Eno, (1 September 1913), British Columbia, Canada, Marriage Index, 1872-1935, Registration Number 1913-09-099131 , BCA Number B11381; GSU Number 1983709. Hereinafter cited as British Columbia, Canada, Marriage Index, 1872-1935.
  2. [S15678] 1921 Census of Canada, Vancouver, British Columbia, of William Small household #25, digital copy of original document, Reference Number RG 31; Folder Number 12; Page Number 2. Library & Archives Canada, 395 Wellington St., Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

Xenophen Adam Ensey

M, #28299
Last Edited16 Apr 2001

Family: Xenophen Adam Ensey and Willie Ann Slaton

Abner Ensigh1

M, #88203, b. 30 January 1853
FatherJoseph E Ensigh1
MotherAbigail 'Abby' Durfee Cory1 b. 6 May 1824, d. 13 Nov 1895
Relationship6th cousin 3 times removed of David Arthur Walker
ChartsDescendants of John Cory & Agnis Wauker
Last Edited28 Mar 2003
Birth*Abner Ensigh was born on 30 January 1853.1 
He was the son of Joseph E Ensigh and Abigail 'Abby' Durfee Cory.1 

Citations

  1. [S2043] Cory Family Society. This site contains genealogies of several early Corey/Cory families., online http://www.coryfamsoc.com. Hereinafter cited as Cory Family Society.

Joseph E Ensigh1

M, #86911
ChartsDescendants of John Cory & Agnis Wauker
Last Edited28 Mar 2003
Marriage*Joseph E Ensigh married Abigail 'Abby' Durfee Cory, daughter of Abner Cory and Mary Gray, on 17 February 1852.1 

Children of Joseph E Ensigh and Abigail 'Abby' Durfee Cory

Citations

  1. [S2043] Cory Family Society. This site contains genealogies of several early Corey/Cory families., online http://www.coryfamsoc.com. Hereinafter cited as Cory Family Society.

Luella Ensigh1

F, #83838, b. circa 1880
ChartsDescendants of John Cory & Agnis Wauker
Descendants of William Dyer & Mary Barrett
Last Edited28 Mar 2003
Birth*Luella Ensigh was born circa 1880.1 
Marriage*She married Forest Fayette Corey, son of Fayette Zenas Corey and Emery Elizabeth Corey, circa 1905.1 

Family: Luella Ensigh and Forest Fayette Corey

Citations

  1. [S2043] Cory Family Society. This site contains genealogies of several early Corey/Cory families., online http://www.coryfamsoc.com. Hereinafter cited as Cory Family Society.

Mary Ensigh1

F, #86926, b. circa 1855
FatherJoseph E Ensigh1
MotherAbigail 'Abby' Durfee Cory1 b. 6 May 1824, d. 13 Nov 1895
Relationship6th cousin 3 times removed of David Arthur Walker
ChartsDescendants of John Cory & Agnis Wauker
Last Edited16 Apr 2011
Birth*Mary Ensigh was born circa 1855.1 
She was the daughter of Joseph E Ensigh and Abigail 'Abby' Durfee Cory.1 

Citations

  1. [S2043] Cory Family Society. This site contains genealogies of several early Corey/Cory families., online http://www.coryfamsoc.com. Hereinafter cited as Cory Family Society.

Martin Ensinger1

M, #88723, b. circa 1863
ChartsDescendants of John Cory & Agnis Wauker
Last Edited28 Mar 2003
Birth*Martin Ensinger was born circa 1863.1 
Marriage*He married Nora Jane Corey, daughter of William E Corey and Mary L Barker, on 30 July 1882.1 

Family: Martin Ensinger and Nora Jane Corey

Citations

  1. [S2043] Cory Family Society. This site contains genealogies of several early Corey/Cory families., online http://www.coryfamsoc.com. Hereinafter cited as Cory Family Society.

Maria Epp

F, #20188
Last Edited16 Apr 2001

Child of Maria Epp and Wilhelm Martens

Albert Erb1

M, #65997
ChartsDescendants of Edward Cottle
Last Edited15 May 2011
Marriage*Albert Erb married Myna Blanche Olmstead, daughter of Miles Olmstead and Elizabeth 'Lizzie' Jane Dykeman

Children of Albert Erb and Myna Blanche Olmstead

Citations

  1. [S1039] Melinda McCoy, "Melinda McCoy, compiled records" (Seattle, Washington, U.S.A.). . Hereinafter cited as "Melinda McCoy, compiled records."

George William Erb1

M, #65999, b. 11 November 1899
FatherAlbert Erb
MotherMyna Blanche Olmstead b. 3 Jul 1876, d. 14 Jan 1924
Relationship4th cousin 1 time removed of David Arthur Walker
ChartsDescendants of Edward Cottle
Last Edited24 Jan 2002
Birth*George William Erb was born on 11 November 1899.1 
He was the son of Albert Erb and Myna Blanche Olmstead

Citations

  1. [S1039] Melinda McCoy, "Melinda McCoy, compiled records" (Seattle, Washington, U.S.A.). . Hereinafter cited as "Melinda McCoy, compiled records."

Hazel May Erb1

F, #65998, b. 8 January 1898, d. 1934
FatherAlbert Erb
MotherMyna Blanche Olmstead b. 3 Jul 1876, d. 14 Jan 1924
Relationship4th cousin 1 time removed of David Arthur Walker
ChartsDescendants of Edward Cottle
Last Edited24 Jan 2002
Birth*Hazel May Erb was born on 8 January 1898.1 
She was the daughter of Albert Erb and Myna Blanche Olmstead
Death*Hazel May Erb died in 1934.1 

Citations

  1. [S1039] Melinda McCoy, "Melinda McCoy, compiled records" (Seattle, Washington, U.S.A.). . Hereinafter cited as "Melinda McCoy, compiled records."

Myrtle Elizabeth Erb1

F, #66000, b. 6 March 1909
FatherAlbert Erb
MotherMyna Blanche Olmstead b. 3 Jul 1876, d. 14 Jan 1924
Relationship4th cousin 1 time removed of David Arthur Walker
ChartsDescendants of Edward Cottle
Last Edited24 Jan 2002
Birth*Myrtle Elizabeth Erb was born on 6 March 1909.1 
She was the daughter of Albert Erb and Myna Blanche Olmstead

Citations

  1. [S1039] Melinda McCoy, "Melinda McCoy, compiled records" (Seattle, Washington, U.S.A.). . Hereinafter cited as "Melinda McCoy, compiled records."

Julia Leona Ergle

F, #2867, b. 15 December 1876, d. 10 May 1963
Last Edited19 Aug 2002
Birth*Julia Leona Ergle was born on 15 December 1876 in South Carolina, U.S.A.
Marriage*She married Wade Hampton Harrison, son of Thomas Joseph Harrison and Nancy Elizabeth Marchbanks, on 26 June 1906. In Madison, South Carolina, U.S.A.
Death*Julia Leona Ergle died on 10 May 1963, at age 86. 

Family: Julia Leona Ergle and Wade Hampton Harrison

Hulda Maria Erickson

F, #26902
Last Edited16 Apr 2001

Family: Hulda Maria Erickson and Charles Gustafson

Minnie Josephine Erickson1

F, #64215, b. 8 January 1877, d. 3 June 1953
Last Edited2 Mar 2007
Birth*Minnie Josephine Erickson was born on 8 January 1877 in Dooleyville, Scott County, Minnesota, U.S.A..1 
Marriage*She married George Westley Freer, son of Richard E.Watson Freer and Abigail Norton, on 4 October 1892. In Princeton, Mille Lacs County, Minnesota, U.S.A..1 
Death*Minnie Josephine Erickson died on 3 June 1953, at age 76, in Princeton Township, Mille Lacs County, Minnesota, U.S.A..1 
Burial*She was buried in Opstead Baptist Cemetery, Mille Lacs County, Minnesota, U.S.A..1 

Children of Minnie Josephine Erickson and George Westley Freer

Citations

  1. [S1066] William 'Bill' Edward Purves, "William 'Bill' Edward Purves, family records" (Clarckston, Missouri). . Hereinafter cited as "William 'Bill' Edward Purves, family records."

Nancy Erickson

F, #25506
Last Edited16 Apr 2001

Child of Nancy Erickson and Marion Hogan

Rebecca Wheaton Erickson1

F, #84039, b. 28 October 1941
Last Edited28 Mar 2003
Birth*Rebecca Wheaton Erickson was born on 28 October 1941 in Chicago, Cook County, Illinois.1 

Citations

  1. [S2043] Cory Family Society. This site contains genealogies of several early Corey/Cory families., online http://www.coryfamsoc.com. Hereinafter cited as Cory Family Society.

Harry Arnold Eriksen1

M, #46710, b. 21 July 1923, d. 16 October 1961
Last Edited19 Mar 2011
Birth*Harry Arnold Eriksen was born on 21 July 1923 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.2,1 
Marriage*He married Evelyn June Sheehan, daughter of Michael William Sheehan and Wilhelmina Henrietta Catherine Kapitain, on 11 April 1945. In Westmoreland Church, Hallam St., Toronto, Ontario, Canada.1 
Death*Harry Arnold Eriksen died on 16 October 1961, at age 38, in Toronto, Ontario, Canada; cause of death was cancer.3,1 
Burial*He was buried in Prospect Cemetery (North End), Toronto, Ontario, Canada.1 

Child of Harry Arnold Eriksen and Evelyn June Sheehan

Citations

  1. [S1234] Kathy Sheehan, Family records, Personal files.
  2. [S914] Harry Arnold Eriksen, Birth registration, Birth Certificate for Harry Arnold Eriksen. Vital Statistics, Province of Ontario. (), Personal Archives of Kathy Sheehan, Barrie, Ontario, Canada.
  3. [S915] Death Certificate for Harry Arnold Eriksen, Harry Arnold Eriksen entry. Death Certificate for Harry Arnold Eriksen. Vital Statistics, Province of Ontario..Personal Archives of Kathy Sheehan, Barrie, Ontario, Canada. Hereinafter cited as Death Certificate for Harry Arnold Eriksen.

Peter Ian Eriksen1

M, #46711, b. 5 December 1956, d. 17 October 2007
FatherHarry Arnold Eriksen1 b. 21 Jul 1923, d. 16 Oct 1961
MotherEvelyn June Sheehan1 b. 10 Jun 1923, d. 21 Dec 2011
Last Edited5 Apr 2013
Note*Peter Ian ( Pronounced-Jan **Ian is the Swedish spelling of Jan** )Eriksen.1 
Birth*Peter Ian Eriksen was born on 5 December 1956 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.1 
He was the son of Harry Arnold Eriksen and Evelyn June Sheehan.1 
Death*Peter Ian Eriksen died on 17 October 2007, at age 50; cause of death was stomach cancer.1 

Citations

  1. [S1234] Kathy Sheehan, Family records, Personal files.

Lillie Ernest1

F, #79596
Last Edited12 Dec 2002

Citations

  1. [S1775] Grace Raymond, The Family of Henry Maham of Blenheim Hill, Schoharie County, New York (n.p.: Mayham Family Reunion Committee, 1950), 35. Hereinafter cited as The Family of Henry Maham of Blenheim Hill.

Edna Ernst

F, #16477
Last Edited16 Apr 2001
Marriage*Edna Ernst married Ira Dwight Peel, son of Ernest Ira Peel and Sadie Agnes Purdy, on 25 April 1923. 

Family: Edna Ernst and Ira Dwight Peel

Britta Ersdotter1

F, #50569
Last Edited24 Jan 2002
Marriage*Britta Ersdotter married Olaf Olson in Leksand, Darlarna, Sweden.2 
Birth*Britta Ersdotter was born in Sweden.2 

Child of Britta Ersdotter and Olaf Olson

Citations

  1. [S1129] "Genealogy Chart of the Nelson Family, pages 1,2,3", compiled & prepared by Janice Marie Peterson, to Donald R. Coy (Seattle, Washington, U.S.A.); Personal Archives of Donald Coy, Seattle, Washington, U.S.A.. Hereinafter cited as "Genealogy Chart of the Nelson Family."
  2. [S1129] "Genealogy Chart of the Nelson Family, pages 1,2,3", compiled & prepared by Janice Marie Peterson, to Donald R. Coy (Seattle, Washington, U.S.A.), Genealogy Chart of the Nelson Family,pages 1,2,3 compiled & prepared by Janice Marie Peterson; Personal Archives of Donald Coy, Seattle, Washington, U.S.A.. Hereinafter cited as "Genealogy Chart of the Nelson Family."

Johanna Marie Erson

F, #23585
Last Edited16 Apr 2001

Child of Johanna Marie Erson and Carl August Johnson