Milton Dyer1,2

M
FatherSamuel Dyer b. 1 Apr 1761
MotherAbigail Gardner b. 2 Mar 1764, d. 1825
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Note*Married, and lived at Whitestown, NY, had two sons and a daughter. He died in Canastota at the home of his daughter who was then Mrs.Beecher. We have no record of the two sons. The first town meeting in Marcy, Oneida Co., NY was held May 1, 1832,'at the school house near Samuel Camp's.' Isaac Bronson, a justice of thepeace, presided, and the following officers were elected: ; town clerk,Milton Dyer. From 1833 to 1896, inclusive, the following named persons have served assupervisors of the townof Marcy; 1834-35, Milton Dyer. 
Birth*Milton Dyer was born in of Whitestown, New York
He was the son of Samuel Dyer and Abigail Gardner

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S1493] Lillian May and Charles Morris Gardner, Gardner History and Genealogy (Erie, Pennsylvania, U.S.A.: The Erie Printing Co., 1907). Hereinafter cited as Gardner History and Genealogy.
  2. [S1699] Daniel E. Wager, Our Country & It's People, A Descriptive work on Oneida County, New York (Boston, Massachusetts: The Boston History Co., 1896), 400-401. Hereinafter cited as Our Country & It's People, Oneida Co., NY.

Milton Dyer

M
FatherJustin Dyer b. 15 Jul 1829
MotherMariah Patchin b. c 21 Dec 1831, d. 12 Jan 1879
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Milton Dyer was the son of Justin Dyer and Mariah Patchin

Monroe Dyer1

M, b. after 1787
FatherHenry Dyer b. 10 Jul 1759, d. 2 Jan 1855
MotherSarah Coy b. 1769, d. 26 Jul 1846
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Birth*Monroe Dyer was born after 1787 in Shaftsbury, Bennington County, Vermont
He was the son of Henry Dyer and Sarah Coy

Citations

  1. [S1423] C. C. Olin, A Complete Record of the John Olin Family (Indianapolis: Baker-Randolph Co., Printers, 1893), 76. Hereinafter cited as A Complete Record of the John Olin Family.

Monroe Leander Dyer1

M, b. 13 October 1849, d. 10 February 1926
FatherLevi Latham Dyer b. 1 Nov 1825, d. 13 Apr 1910
MotherSusan A. Rhodes b. 1 Oct 1821, d. 11 Nov 1859
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Birth*Monroe Leander Dyer was born on 13 October 1849 in Rodman, Jefferson County, New York
He was the son of Levi Latham Dyer and Susan A. Rhodes
Marriage*Monroe Leander Dyer married Mary J. Scolfield on 21 April 1885 in Waukegan, Wisconsin.1 
Death*Monroe Leander Dyer died on 10 February 1926 in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California, U.S.A., at age 76. 

Family

Mary J. Scolfield

Citations

  1. [S1403] Correspondence with Denise Martelle, 8 May 2000. Unknown repository (unknown repository address).

Moses Dyer1

M, b. circa 1789
FatherHenry Dyer b. 10 Jul 1759, d. 2 Jan 1855
MotherSarah Coy b. 1769, d. 26 Jul 1846
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Note*PARENTS-SIBLINGS: Wm. Heller Dyar, 'The DYAR (DYER) Families', ms. fromNatl Gen Soc. 
Birth*Moses Dyer was born circa 1789 in Shaftsbury, Bennington County, Vermont
He was the son of Henry Dyer and Sarah Coy

Citations

  1. [S1423] C. C. Olin, A Complete Record of the John Olin Family (Indianapolis: Baker-Randolph Co., Printers, 1893), 76. Hereinafter cited as A Complete Record of the John Olin Family.

Moses Dyer

M, b. 5 January 1764, d. circa 1820
FatherJohn Dyer b. 27 Dec 1726, d. 28 Apr 1784
MotherMary Hickey
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Note*Had 13 children. 
Birth*Moses Dyer was born on 5 January 1764 in Woodstock, Connecticut
He was the son of John Dyer and Mary Hickey
Death*Moses Dyer died circa 1820 in New Hampshire

Moses Dyer1

M, b. 1800, d. before 11 January 1873
FatherJames Dyer b. 23 Apr 1756, d. 3 Mar 1835
MotherMary Marcy b. 19 Jan 1760, d. 13 Oct 1844
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Note*From Leslie Dyer: Went to Broome Co., NY; wifes name is Mary. [Gedcom,Pat Miller] 
Birth*Moses Dyer was born in 1800. 
He was the son of James Dyer and Mary Marcy
Death*Moses Dyer died before 11 January 1873. 

Citations

  1. [S1526] Patricia Miller, Patricia Miller (in files of Donald R. Coy), downloaded Nov. 1999.

Moses Dyer1

M, b. after 1795
FatherEdward Dyer b. 27 Aug 1767
MotherAbigail Stockbridge Josselyn
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Birth*Moses Dyer was born after 1795. 
He was the son of Edward Dyer and Abigail Stockbridge Josselyn

Citations

  1. [S1475] Genealogies of Rhode Island Families, 2 Volumes (Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A.: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1983), 497. Hereinafter cited as Genealogies of Rhode Island Families.

Nancy Dyer

F, b. after 1861
FatherCol. Elisha Dyer Gov. b. 28 Nov 1839, d. 29 Nov 1906
MotherNancy Anthony Viall b. c 1843, d. 1 Dec 1920
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Birth*Nancy Dyer was born after 1861. 
She was the daughter of Col. Elisha Dyer Gov. and Nancy Anthony Viall

Nancy Dyer

F, b. 17 October 1783
FatherJames Dyer b. 23 Apr 1756, d. 3 Mar 1835
MotherMary Marcy b. 19 Jan 1760, d. 13 Oct 1844
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Birth*Nancy Dyer was born on 17 October 1783 in Dudley, Worcester County, Massachusetts
She was the daughter of James Dyer and Mary Marcy

Nancy Dyer

F, b. circa 1850
FatherGeorge Hazard Dyer Jr. b. 10 Jan 1816, d. 12 May 1896
MotherAnn Eliza Dana b. 11 Apr 1813, d. 10 Apr 1858
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Birth*Nancy Dyer was born circa 1850 in Florence, Oneida County, New York
She was the daughter of George Hazard Dyer Jr. and Ann Eliza Dana

Nancy Dyer

F, b. 4 May 1898
FatherDewitt Clinton Dyer b. 22 Apr 1874, d. Aug 1960
MotherMarie Glendon Case b. 18 Aug 1877, d. 5 Sep 1962
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Note*She isn't mentioned in 1913 History of Ryegate. 
Birth*Nancy Dyer was born on 4 May 1898 in Houston, Houston County, Minnesota
She was the daughter of Dewitt Clinton Dyer and Marie Glendon Case

Nancy Dyer1

F, b. circa 1783, d. 1852
FatherJones Dyer , Sr. b. 13 Mar 1736/37, d. a 28 Nov 1826
MotherHannah Harrington b. 15 May 1741, d. 8 May 1836
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Note*The marriage of Nancy Dyer to Thomas Milberry is reportedly in 'TheAnnals of Calais & St. Stephen.' 
Birth*Nancy Dyer was born circa 1783. 
She was the daughter of Jones Dyer , Sr. and Hannah Harrington
Death*Nancy Dyer died in 1852. 

Citations

  1. [S1615] Punta Gorda Joseph W Pehousek, Descendants of Jones Dyer, Sr. and Hannah 'Herrington' (: self published, October 1999). Hereinafter cited as Descendants of Jones Dyer, Sr. and Hannah 'Herrington.'

Nancy Dyer1

F, b. after 1818, d. 13 April 1823
FatherPeter W. Dyer b. 12 Oct 1796, d. 4 Sep 1862
MotherNancy Farnham b. 27 May 1798, d. 13 Apr 1823
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Birth*Nancy Dyer was born after 1818. 
She was the daughter of Peter W. Dyer and Nancy Farnham
Death*Nancy Dyer died on 13 April 1823. 

Citations

  1. [S1403] Correspondence with Denise Martelle, 8 May 2000. Unknown repository (unknown repository address).

Nancy Dyer

F, b. circa 1771
FatherBarrett Dyer , Capt. b. 1745
MotherMary (Nee?) Dyer
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Note*Nancy, dau. of Barret and Mary Dyre and wife of Henry Young, Baptized,Sophiasburgh, Feb. 26, 1794. 
Note*60. Henry Young, sixth; Nancy Dyre, same, 30 August, 1791 ElijahMiller, John Richard, jr., Archd. Campbell, Jennet Campbell. (Note: sixth= Township of Sophiasburgh). 
Birth*Nancy Dyer was born circa 1771 in Of Sophiasburgh, Ontario, Canada
She was the daughter of Barrett Dyer , Capt. and Mary (Nee?) Dyer
Marriage*Nancy Dyer married Henry Young on 30 August 1791 in Prince Edward County, Ontario, Canada.1 

Family

Henry Young d. 1812
Child

Citations

  1. [S1792] Papers & Records Ontario Historical Society, The Registers of Rev. John Langhorn, Vol. 1 (Toronto, Ontario: privately published, 1899, reprint 1930), 14-70. Hereinafter cited as The Registers of Rev. John Langhorn.

Nancy Dyer1

F, b. 20 May 1818, d. 21 June 1884
FatherCalvin Dyer b. 5 Nov 1799, d. 26 Apr 1885
MotherElizabeth 'Betsey' Sherwood b. 15 Jan 1803, d. 8 Nov 1886
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Birth*Nancy Dyer was born on 20 May 1818. 
She was the daughter of Calvin Dyer and Elizabeth 'Betsey' Sherwood
Marriage*Nancy Dyer married Elam Gallup on 17 December 1835 in Jefferson, Schohaire County, New York
Death*Nancy Dyer died on 21 June 1884 at age 66.1 

Family

Elam Gallup b. 27 October 1814, d. 29 May 1877
Child

Citations

  1. [S1683] John D. Gallup, Genealogy of the Gallup Family (Hartford, Connecticut: Hartford Printing Co., 1893). Hereinafter cited as Genealogy of the Gallup Family.

Nancy Anthony Dyer1,2

F, b. 1903, d. 24 August 1979
FatherHezekiah Anthony Dyer , Col. b. 28 Oct 1872, d. 24 Aug 1943
MotherCharlotte Osgood Tilden b. 1874, d. 10 Nov 1953
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited22 Nov 2010
Birth*Nancy Anthony Dyer was born in 1903 in Riverside, Providence County, Rhode Island.3 
She was the daughter of Hezekiah Anthony Dyer , Col. and Charlotte Osgood Tilden
Note*She was an artist and had shows with her father in Boston. 
Death*Nancy Anthony Dyer died on 24 August 1979 in Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island.3 
Burial*She was buried in Swan Point Cemetery, Blackstone Blvd., Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island.3 

Citations

  1. [S1492] Albert N. Marquis, Who's Who in New England (Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.: A. N. Marquis & Co., 1916 (second edition)), 4:200. Hereinafter cited as Who's Who in New England.
  2. [S1371] Bertha Williams Anthony, Roger Williams of Providence, Rhode Island (: Mrs. C. W. Bertha Williams Anthony, 1949), 180. Hereinafter cited as Roger Williams of Providence, R.I.
  3. [S1355] Rhode Island Historical Society, Rhode Island Historical Cemeteries, Transcription Project Index (on-line, http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~rigenweb/cemetery/: Rootsweb, on-going project). Hereinafter cited as Rhode Island Historical Cemeteries.

Nancy F. Dyer1

F, b. 3 November 1821
FatherJohn Dyer b. 9 May 1798, d. 13 Dec 1823
MotherAurilla Matteson b. 2 Sep 1797, d. 15 Mar 1879
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Birth*Nancy F. Dyer was born on 3 November 1821. 
She was the daughter of John Dyer and Aurilla Matteson

Citations

  1. [S1403] Correspondence with Denise Martelle, 8 May 2000. Unknown repository (unknown repository address).

Nancy Malinda Dyer1

F, b. 20 March 1882, d. 14 March 1959
FatherStephen S Dyer b. 27 Sep 1846, d. 21 Jul 1924
MotherRocselana Minard Cooper b. 28 Nov 1853, d. 22 May 1920
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Note*Her mother's (Roxie M. Dyer) will shows everything being left to'Linnie', and One dollar each to Sigel,Roland,Glorannah and Abbie Jane.Family history has it that Roxie wanted Linnie to have the family farm toraise her family because Linnie's husband (George Thomas Atkins) had runoff and left her with three children to raise. He apparently didn't run far as he reportedly stayed in the Elk River -Cambridge area and started a hotel for working men. He stayed in contactwith Sigel G. Dyer, but never contacted his wife or children. [JWP] 
Birth*Nancy Malinda Dyer was born on 20 March 1882 in Bethel, Anoka County, Minnesota
She was the daughter of Stephen S Dyer and Rocselana Minard Cooper
Marriage*Nancy Malinda Dyer married George Thomas Atkins after 7 June 1900.1 
Death*Nancy Malinda Dyer died on 14 March 1959 in Cambridge, Isanti County, Minnesota, at age 76. 
Burial*She was buried on 14 March 1959 in Bethel, Anoka County, Minnesota

Family

George Thomas Atkins d. after 1910
Children

Citations

  1. [S1615] Punta Gorda Joseph W Pehousek, Descendants of Jones Dyer, Sr. and Hannah 'Herrington' (: self published, October 1999). Hereinafter cited as Descendants of Jones Dyer, Sr. and Hannah 'Herrington.'

NancyAnna Dyer

F, b. circa 1762
FatherJohn Dyer b. 1733, d. Mar 1791
MotherBathsheba Dunn b. 11 Jul 1734
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited10 May 2006
Birth*NancyAnna Dyer was born circa 1762. 
She was the daughter of John Dyer and Bathsheba Dunn
Marriage*NancyAnna Dyer married Peleg Slocum on 4 May 1793 in Jamestown, Newport County, Rhode Island.1,2 

Family

Peleg Slocum
Child

Citations

  1. [S1824] Alden Gamaliel Beaman, Rhode Island Vital Records, New Series, Volume 5, Washington County (Princeton, Mass.: Franklin P. Rice (on-line, New England Historic Genealogical Society), 1978), 125. Hereinafter cited as Rhode Island Vital Records, Vol. 5.
  2. [S1377] James Newell Arnold, Vital Records of Rhode Island 1636-1850, Births, Marriages & Deaths Vol.4, Newport County (Providence, RI.: Narraganset Hist. Publishing Co., 1893), 8. Hereinafter cited as Vital Records of Rhode Island, Vol. 4.

Nathan Dyer1

M, b. 6 December 1764, d. 21 January 1810
FatherCharles Dyer b. 21 Nov 1742, d. 14 Aug 1823
MotherPhebe Pearce b. 25 May 1743, d. 5 May 1822
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Note*Res. Cranston, RI. 
Birth*Nathan Dyer was born on 6 December 1764 in Cranston, Providence County, Rhode Island
He was the son of Charles Dyer and Phebe Pearce
Marriage*Nathan Dyer married Harty Hawkins, daughter of Abraham Hawkins, on 27 April 1782. 
Death*Nathan Dyer died on 21 January 1810 in Cranston, Providence County, Rhode Island, at age 45.2 

Family

Harty Hawkins b. 2 March 1769, d. 2 June 1823
Children

Citations

  1. [S1348] William Allan Dyer, By the Name of Dyer, A Genealogical Record, 1940). Hereinafter cited as By the Name of Dyer.
  2. [S1405] James N. Arnold, Vital Records of Rhode Island 1636-1850, Vol. XIII - Births, Marriages & Deaths (Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A.: Narragansett Historical Publishing Co., 1903). Hereinafter cited as Vital Records of Rhode Island 1636-1850.

Nathan Dyer

M, b. circa 1790
FatherJones Dyer , Sr. b. 13 Mar 1736/37, d. a 28 Nov 1826
MotherHannah Harrington b. 15 May 1741, d. 8 May 1836
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Note*The following is an entry in the Diaries of Richard Vose Hayden ofRobbinston, Maine: September 15, 1845: 'Nathaniel Brooks & family, John Farson & family, &Nathan Dyer & family are all going to Wisconsin. They go from here toNew York in Brigg Belle, George Vose Captn., & will probably sail toniteas they are only waiting for a wind.' (sent by Steve Robbins 1/25/2001) He died after 1830 but before 1875. The 1830 Calais census shows Nathan(b. 1790-1800), his wife (b. 1800-10), and children: one boy born1825-30, one boy born 1820-25, and one girl born 1820-25. He was animmediate neighbor to Samuel Dyer [P28] and James Dyer Jr. [P29] -- bothsons of James Dyer, and Nathan's two cousins. After 1830 he moved away from Calais (see above) Probably the Nathan Dyer who sold land in Calais to Jones Dyer Junior for$1000. On the same day Jones Dyer Junior sold Nathan Dyer the same pieceof land for $1000. Land was northwesterly of a lot marked 'James Dyer'sheirs' upon the plan and numbered 25, and southeasterly by land formerlyowned by Stephen Dyer junior lot numbered 24 and marked 'Jones Dyer' uponthe plan - on 28 Nov 1826. The deed from Nathan to Jones additionallystates 'Provided nevertheless, that if the said Nathan Dyer his heirsexecutors or administrators pay to the said Jones Dyer Junior his heirsexecutors administrators or assigns the sum of three hundred & thirteendollars payable in three equal annual payments the first payment to bemade in one year from date with interest annually. And also take theparents of the said Jones Dyer Junior & support them in sickness & inhealth from the date of these presents for and during their natural lives& furnish them with good and comfortable food & clothing also with a good& comfortable room & bed room bed & bedding for their sole use and in allrespects to take such care of them as to render them comfortable duringtheir natural lives free of expense to said Dyer then this deed, and alsoa certain note of hand bearing even date with these presents, given bythe said Nathan Dyer to the said Jones Dyer Junior to pay the sum ofthree hundred and thirteen dollars at the times aforesaid shall be void,otherwise shall remain in full force.' ........ (Sig) Nathan Dyer[Wash. Co. Deeds, 17:201 & 17:202]. 
Birth*Nathan Dyer was born circa 1790 in Calais, Washington County, Maine
He was the son of Jones Dyer , Sr. and Hannah Harrington

Nathan H Dyer1

M, b. 3 March 1877
FatherDaniel D Dyer b. c 1834, d. b 1902
MotherCynthia M. Saffill b. 1848, d. a 1902
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Note*1880 US Census; LDS film 1,254,615; p5 SD 3 ED 46; 1 June 1880 Minneapolis City Directory. late 1800's - 1900's. p321. MinnesotaGenealogical Society, 1650 Carroll Ave., St. Paul, MN, Date of entry:1895. 'DYER, Nathan tmstr Carpenter & Lamb boarder 2537 ne 3d' [JWP]. 
Birth*Nathan H Dyer was born on 3 March 1877 in Bethel, Anoka County, Minnesota
He was the son of Daniel D Dyer and Cynthia M. Saffill

Citations

  1. [S1615] Punta Gorda Joseph W Pehousek, Descendants of Jones Dyer, Sr. and Hannah 'Herrington' (: self published, October 1999). Hereinafter cited as Descendants of Jones Dyer, Sr. and Hannah 'Herrington.'

Nathaniel Dyer1

M, b. between 1667 and 1668, d. 2 October 1738
FatherSamuel Dyer b. 20 Dec 1635, d. 4 Apr 1691
MotherAnne Hutchinson b. 18 Nov 1643, d. 10 Jan 1716/17
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Note*He was a butcher. 1702-3-4 Attorney General. 1718, Mar. He bought suit against Thomas Pelham for L17, 5s, 7d, the billbeing for butcher meat sold and delivered at sundry times. [Gen. Dict. of RI] Resided Newport, RI Married by Jn. Coggleshall [WAD]. 
Birth*Nathaniel Dyer was born between 1667 and 1668 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts
He was the son of Samuel Dyer and Anne Hutchinson
Marriage*Nathaniel Dyer married Elizabeth Parrot, daughter of Simon Parrott, on 9 August 1688 in Newport, Newport County, Rhode Island.2,3 
Death*Nathaniel Dyer died on 2 October 1738 in Newport, Newport County, Rhode Island.1 

Family

Elizabeth Parrot b. circa 1663
Children

Citations

  1. [S1348] William Allan Dyer, By the Name of Dyer, A Genealogical Record, 1940). Hereinafter cited as By the Name of Dyer.
  2. [S1815] Clarence Almon Torrey & Elizabeth Petty Bentley, New England Marriages Prior to 1700 (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1985). Hereinafter cited as New England Marriages Prior to 1700.
  3. [S1377] James Newell Arnold, Vital Records of Rhode Island 1636-1850, Births, Marriages & Deaths Vol.4, Newport County (Providence, RI.: Narraganset Hist. Publishing Co., 1893), 26. Hereinafter cited as Vital Records of Rhode Island, Vol. 4.

Nathaniel Dyer1,2

M, b. 24 July 1715
FatherWilliam Dyer b. c 1665, d. Oct 1716
MotherJane Eyre
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Note*Admission & Baptisms of 2nd Church of Boston MA. taken from The Essex Genealogist Nov 1992: Among other Dyers -- Nathaniel of Jane Baptized 24 Jul 1715 and William of ?? baptized 2 Jun 1717. 
Birth*Nathaniel Dyer was born on 24 July 1715. 
He was the son of William Dyer and Jane Eyre

Citations

  1. [S1348] William Allan Dyer, By the Name of Dyer, A Genealogical Record, 1940). Hereinafter cited as By the Name of Dyer.
  2. [S1353] Lora Altine Woodbury Underhill, Descendants of Edward Small of New England (Revised Edition) (Boston & New York: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1934). Hereinafter cited as Descendants of Edward Small of New England.

Capt. Nathaniel Dyer1,2

M, b. circa 1728, d. 7 July 1801
FatherSamuel Dyer b. 1703, d. c 1760
MotherTabitha Niles b. c 1706, d. 1795
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited11 Feb 2011
Birth*Capt. Nathaniel Dyer was born circa 1728 in of W. Greenwich, Kent County, Rhode Island
He was the son of Samuel Dyer and Tabitha Niles
Marriage*Capt. Nathaniel Dyer married Sarah Sheffield, daughter of Isaac Sheffield, on 9 March 1755 in E. Greenwich, Kent County, Rhode Island; they were married by Thomas Aldrich, Justice of the Peace.3,2,4 
Marriage*Capt. Nathaniel Dyer married Abigail Herrick on 12 November 1775 in Stonington, New London County, Connecticut.5 
Death*Capt. Nathaniel Dyer died on 7 July 1801 in East Greenwich, Kent County, Rhode Island.6 

Family 1

Sarah Sheffield

Family 2

Abigail Herrick b. 1746, d. circa 1783
Children

Citations

  1. [S1379] World Family Tree, online ancestry.com, Vol. 8, #0079. Hereinafter cited as World Family Tree.
  2. [S1363] Liela Morse Wilson, 10 Generations from William & Mary Dyer of Newport, R.I. (Putnam, CT: Privately published, 1949). Hereinafter cited as 10 Generations from William & Mary Dyer of Newport, R.I.
  3. [S1631] LDS, "International Genealogical Index, North America" (Salt Lake City, Utah). . Hereinafter cited as "International Genealogical Index."
  4. [S1437] James N. Arnold, Vital Records of Rhode Island 1636-1850, Births, Marriages & Deaths, Vol. 1, Kent County (Providence, Rhode Island: Narragansett Historical Publishing Co., 1891), p. 26. Hereinafter cited as Vital Records of Rhode Island 1636-1850.
  5. [S5214] Correspondence with Richard Berland (France). Personal Archives of David Arthur Walker (Edwards, Ontario, Canada).
  6. [S1547] Bruce Campbell MacGunnigle, East Greenwich, Rhode Island, Historical Cemeteries (East Greenwich, Rhode Island, U.S.A.: Minuteman Press, 1991), Cemetery #69. Hereinafter cited as East Greenwich, RI, Historical Cemeteries.
  7. [S5213] "American Enterprise in Britain's Industrial Revolution," (MS, 1955; American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Vol. 14, pp. 193-198.); Print in Dyer folder, Personal Archives of David Arthur Walker; Edwards, Ontario, Canada. Hereinafter cited as "American Enterprise in Britain's Industrial Revolution."

Nehemiah Dyer1

M
FatherOliver Dyer b. bt 1740 - 1774
MotherPatience Sweet b. 1740
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Nehemiah Dyer was the son of Oliver Dyer and Patience Sweet

Citations

  1. [S1348] William Allan Dyer, By the Name of Dyer, A Genealogical Record, 1940). Hereinafter cited as By the Name of Dyer.

Nellie Dyer1

F, b. 1851
FatherJohn Dyer b. 1826
MotherEliza (Nee?) Dyer b. c 1830
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Note*From Leslie Dyer: 1870 Broome Co age 18 lives with parents and family. 
Birth*Nellie Dyer was born in 1851 in New York
She was the daughter of John Dyer and Eliza (Nee?) Dyer

Citations

  1. [S1526] Patricia Miller, Patricia Miller (in files of Donald R. Coy), downloaded Nov. 1999.

Nellie Boynton Dyer

F, b. 14 October 1873, d. 1916
FatherJames Henry Dyer b. 22 Mar 1843, d. 11 Aug 1880
MotherAthelinda Chesterfield Howe b. 4 Oct 1845, d. 6 May 1927
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Birth*Nellie Boynton Dyer was born on 14 October 1873 in Rutland, Rutland County, Vermont
She was the daughter of James Henry Dyer and Athelinda Chesterfield Howe
Marriage*Nellie Boynton Dyer married Fred Flanley on 14 July 1892 in Las Vegas, Clark County, New Mexico
Death*Nellie Boynton Dyer died in 1916 in Denver, Denver County, Colorado, U.S.A.

Family

Fred Flanley

Nellie O. Dyer1

F, b. 20 June 1857, d. 22 February 1913
FatherNewcomb Thomas Dyer b. 17 Sep 1831, d. 27 Feb 1912
MotherEmiline M. Wilcox b. 21 Nov 1840, d. 22 Apr 1912
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited22 Nov 2010
Birth*Nellie O. Dyer was born on 20 June 1857. 
She was the daughter of Newcomb Thomas Dyer and Emiline M. Wilcox
Marriage*Nellie O. Dyer married W. H. Hubbard on 11 October 1878.1 
Death*Nellie O. Dyer died on 22 February 1913 at age 55. 
Burial*She was buried in Maple Hill Cemetery, Van Buren County, Michigan

Family

W. H. Hubbard

Citations

  1. [S1403] Correspondence with Denise Martelle, 8 May 2000. Unknown repository (unknown repository address).

Nellie V. Dyer1

F, b. 11 November 1897, d. 12 February 1898
FatherFrank Everett Dyer b. 2 Dec 1863, d. 26 Sep 1941
MotherHattie Van Deusen b. 13 Jul 1869, d. 8 Apr 1907
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Birth*Nellie V. Dyer was born on 11 November 1897. 
She was the daughter of Frank Everett Dyer and Hattie Van Deusen
Death*Nellie V. Dyer died on 12 February 1898. 

Citations

  1. [S1775] Grace Raymond, The Family of Henry Maham of Blenheim Hill, Schoharie County, New York (n.p.: Mayham Family Reunion Committee, 1950), 35. Hereinafter cited as The Family of Henry Maham of Blenheim Hill.

Nettie F. Dyer1,2,3,4

F, b. 31 December 1865, d. 29 August 1867
FatherSamuel Franklin Dyer b. 26 Apr 1820, d. 20 Apr 1895
MotherSally Russell Austin b. 16 Dec 1821, d. 14 Apr 1903
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited2 Dec 2006
Birth*Nettie F. Dyer was born on 31 December 1865 in Rhode Island
She was the daughter of Samuel Franklin Dyer and Sally Russell Austin
Death*Nettie F. Dyer died on 29 August 1867 in East Greenwich, Kent County, Rhode Island, at age 1.5 
Burial*She was buried in East Greenwich Cemetery, First Ave., East Greenwich, Rhode Island.6 

Citations

  1. [S1363] Liela Morse Wilson, 10 Generations from William & Mary Dyer of Newport, R.I. (Putnam, CT: Privately published, 1949). Hereinafter cited as 10 Generations from William & Mary Dyer of Newport, R.I.
  2. [S1348] William Allan Dyer, By the Name of Dyer, A Genealogical Record, 1940). Hereinafter cited as By the Name of Dyer.
  3. [S1547] Bruce Campbell MacGunnigle, East Greenwich, Rhode Island, Historical Cemeteries (East Greenwich, Rhode Island, U.S.A.: Minuteman Press, 1991). Hereinafter cited as East Greenwich, RI, Historical Cemeteries.
  4. [S1434] Edith Austin Moore, A Genealogy of the Descendants of Robert Austin of Kingstown, Rhode Island self published, 1951), 462. Hereinafter cited as A Genealogy of the Descendants of Robert Austin.
  5. [S1547] Bruce Campbell MacGunnigle, East Greenwich, Rhode Island, Historical Cemeteries (East Greenwich, Rhode Island, U.S.A.: Minuteman Press, 1991), Cemetery #38. Hereinafter cited as East Greenwich, RI, Historical Cemeteries.
  6. [S1355] Rhode Island Historical Society, Rhode Island Historical Cemeteries, Transcription Project Index (on-line, http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~rigenweb/cemetery/: Rootsweb, on-going project). Hereinafter cited as Rhode Island Historical Cemeteries.

Nettie L. Dyer1

F, b. 28 December 1874, d. 18 March 1968
FatherAdoniram Judson Dyer b. 3 Jun 1833, d. 17 Mar 1916
MotherPhoebe Lilly b. 23 Nov 1840, d. 9 Sep 1926
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Birth*Nettie L. Dyer was born on 28 December 1874. 
She was the daughter of Adoniram Judson Dyer and Phoebe Lilly
Death*Nettie L. Dyer died on 18 March 1968 at age 93. 

Citations

  1. [S1403] Correspondence with Denise Martelle, 8 May 2000. Unknown repository (unknown repository address).

Newcomb Thomas Dyer1

M, b. 17 September 1831, d. 27 February 1912
FatherPeter W. Dyer b. 12 Oct 1796, d. 4 Sep 1862
MotherAurilla Matteson b. 2 Sep 1797, d. 15 Mar 1879
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited22 Nov 2010
Birth*Newcomb Thomas Dyer was born on 17 September 1831 in Bennington, Bennington County, Vermont
He was the son of Peter W. Dyer and Aurilla Matteson
Marriage*Newcomb Thomas Dyer married Emiline M. Wilcox, daughter of Hiram Wilcox and Amelia, on 15 September 1856 in Coloma, Berrien County, Michigan.1 
Milit-Serv*Newcomb Thomas Dyer served in the military Civil War, 28th Michigan Infantry. 
Death*He died on 27 February 1912 in Hartford, Van Buren County, Michigan, at age 80. 
Burial*He was buried in Maple Hill Cemetery, Van Buren County, Michigan

Family

Emiline M. Wilcox b. 21 November 1840, d. 22 April 1912
Children

Citations

  1. [S1403] Correspondence with Denise Martelle, 8 May 2000. Unknown repository (unknown repository address).

Newton Randolph Dyer1,2

M, b. 24 August 1876, d. 4 November 1879
FatherDaniel Burns Dyer , Col. b. 21 Mar 1849, d. a 1893
MotherIda May Casey b. 20 Apr 1849
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited14 Mar 2007
Birth*Newton Randolph Dyer was born on 24 August 1876 in Baxter Springs, Cherokee County, Kansas
He was the son of Daniel Burns Dyer , Col. and Ida May Casey
Death*Newton Randolph Dyer died on 4 November 1879 in Baxter Springs, Cherokee County, Kansas, at age 3. 

Citations

  1. [S1423] C. C. Olin, A Complete Record of the John Olin Family (Indianapolis: Baker-Randolph Co., Printers, 1893), 84. Hereinafter cited as A Complete Record of the John Olin Family.
  2. [S1436] Leonard Allison Morrison, History of the Kimball Family, Vol. 1 (Boston, Massachusetts: Damrell & Upham, 1897), 910. Hereinafter cited as History of the Kimball Family, Vol. 1.

Nicholas Dyer1

M, b. after 1796
FatherJoseph Nicholas Dyer b. 31 Jul 1776, d. 15 May 1866
MotherRhodinah Austin b. 1776, d. 10 May 1840
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Note*THE TOWN OF VERNON, Oneida Co., NY : The list of supervisors from 1831 isas follows: 1831-33. Nicholas Dyer. 
Birth*Nicholas Dyer was born after 1796. 
He was the son of Joseph Nicholas Dyer and Rhodinah Austin

Citations

  1. [S1699] Daniel E. Wager, Our Country & It's People, A Descriptive work on Oneida County, New York (Boston, Massachusetts: The Boston History Co., 1896), 433. Hereinafter cited as Our Country & It's People, Oneida Co., NY.

Nicholas D. Dyer1

M, b. 14 January 1841, d. after 1886
FatherDaniel Harris Dyer b. 29 Jan 1797, d. 16 May 1870
MotherPhila Beverstock b. 16 Feb 1803, d. 1882
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Note*He was of Joliet, ILL at last 2 Hardy sister marriages. 
Birth*Nicholas D. Dyer was born on 14 January 1841 in Lexington, Ohio
He was the son of Daniel Harris Dyer and Phila Beverstock
Marriage*Nicholas D. Dyer married Mary A. Lewis on 29 January 1867.1 
Marriage*Nicholas D. Dyer married Juliette V. (Twin) Hardy, daughter of Otis Hardy and Angelia Hopkins, on 6 May 1876.2 
Marriage*Nicholas D. Dyer married Anna Amelia Hardy, daughter of Otis Hardy and Angelia Hopkins, on 10 April 1878.3,2 
Death*Nicholas D. Dyer died after 1886. 

Family 1

Mary A. Lewis b. 29 September 1847, d. 29 June 1870
Child

Family 2

Juliette V. (Twin) Hardy b. 22 September 1847, d. 27 December 1876
Child

Family 3

Anna Amelia Hardy b. 29 January 1842, d. 20 August 1894
Children

Citations

  1. [S1423] C. C. Olin, A Complete Record of the John Olin Family (Indianapolis: Baker-Randolph Co., Printers, 1893), xcv. Hereinafter cited as A Complete Record of the John Olin Family.
  2. [S1794] Timothy Hopkins, John Hopkins of Cambridge, Mass, 1634 and Some of His Descendants (Chicago, Illinois: Stanford University Press, 1932), 254-256. Hereinafter cited as John Hopkins of Cambridge, Mass. & Descendants.
  3. [S1423] C. C. Olin, A Complete Record of the John Olin Family (Indianapolis: Baker-Randolph Co., Printers, 1893), 78. Hereinafter cited as A Complete Record of the John Olin Family.

Nona Dyer1

F, b. 3 August 1863, d. 4 August 1864
FatherNewcomb Thomas Dyer b. 17 Sep 1831, d. 27 Feb 1912
MotherEmiline M. Wilcox b. 21 Nov 1840, d. 22 Apr 1912
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Birth*Nona Dyer was born on 3 August 1863. 
She was the daughter of Newcomb Thomas Dyer and Emiline M. Wilcox
Death*Nona Dyer died on 4 August 1864 at age 1. 

Citations

  1. [S1403] Correspondence with Denise Martelle, 8 May 2000. Unknown repository (unknown repository address).

Nora M. Dyer1

F, b. after 1847
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Birth*Nora M. Dyer was born after 1847 in Paris, Kentucky

Citations

  1. [S1423] C. C. Olin, A Complete Record of the John Olin Family (Indianapolis: Baker-Randolph Co., Printers, 1893), 78. Hereinafter cited as A Complete Record of the John Olin Family.

Norman Murray Dyer1

M, b. 11 March 1882
FatherJames Samuel Dyer b. 21 Dec 1847, d. Dec 1931
MotherMary Elizabeth Potter b. 24 May 1857
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Birth*Norman Murray Dyer was born on 11 March 1882 in Philadelphia, Jefferson County, New York
He was the son of James Samuel Dyer and Mary Elizabeth Potter

Family

May Sherwood b. 24 April 1900

Citations

  1. [S1403] Correspondence with Denise Martelle, 8 May 2000. Unknown repository (unknown repository address).

Olin Gideon Dyer , Md1,2

M, b. 5 December 1822
FatherGideon Dyer b. 28 Sep 1790, d. 1860
MotherElizabeth Reynolds d. b 1850
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Note*1850 Census, Salisbury, Addison Co., Vermont, Roll 920, Page 201 (allborn VT) Olin G. Dyer, 26, M, Physician, Real Estate $600 Annah, 24, F Amelia, 3, F Florence, 1, F. 
Birth*Olin Gideon Dyer , Md was born on 5 December 1822 in Clarendon, Rutland County, Vermont.3 
He was the son of Gideon Dyer and Elizabeth Reynolds
Marriage*Olin Gideon Dyer , Md married Annah Gaines Holt, daughter of Amos Holt and Annah Gains, on 25 August 1846. 

Family

Annah Gaines Holt b. 19 July 1826
Children

Citations

  1. [S1550] W. S. Rann H. P. Smith, History of Rutland County, Vermont (Syracuse, New York, U.S.A.: D. Mason & Co., 1886), 503. Hereinafter cited as History of Rutland County, Vermont.
  2. [S1498] Microfilm, unknown repository address unknown repository, Roll 920, p.201.
  3. [S1423] C. C. Olin, A Complete Record of the John Olin Family (Indianapolis: Baker-Randolph Co., Printers, 1893), 77. Hereinafter cited as A Complete Record of the John Olin Family.

Olive Dyer1

F, b. circa 1793
FatherHenry Dyer b. 10 Jul 1759, d. 2 Jan 1855
MotherSarah Coy b. 1769, d. 26 Jul 1846
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Note*PARENTS-SIBLINGS: Wm. Heller Dyar, 'The DYAR (DYER) Families', ms. fromNatl Gen Soc. 
Birth*Olive Dyer was born circa 1793 in Shaftsbury, Bennington County, Vermont
She was the daughter of Henry Dyer and Sarah Coy

Family

John March
Child

Citations

  1. [S1423] C. C. Olin, A Complete Record of the John Olin Family (Indianapolis: Baker-Randolph Co., Printers, 1893), 76. Hereinafter cited as A Complete Record of the John Olin Family.

Oliver Dyer1,2

M, b. between 1740 and 1774
FatherSamuel Dyer b. 1712, d. 1792
MotherPatience Williams b. 1714, d. 1774
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited21 Nov 2010
Note*An 'Oliver Dyer' Served in Old French & Indian War, in Capt. Fry's Co. in1756. [RI Colonial War Sevicemen, 1740-1762] Oliver Dyer View Image Online™ State: RI Year: 1790 County: Providence Image: 0128 Township: Smithfield Roll: M637_10 buried in Dyer Cemetery in New Berlin, NY (E-mail from Ken Brown, 10-30-98) 'I have been fortunate enough to find two unrelated sources that confirm the maiden name of Celinda Phillips, wife of Isaac Phillips of New Berlin, NY, as DYER. Of course, I had surmised as much since she is buried in the Dyer Cemetery in New Berlin next to Oliver and Patience Dyer, whom I suspect were her parents. I have now pretty much filled in the family of my ancestor, Jeremiah Dyer, son of Oliver and Patience (Sweet) Dyer but I still lack the hard evidence I would like to have. I am also still looking for the whereabouts of Arthur Dyer (suspected brother of Jeremiah, Celinda, and Nehemiah Dyer) after he left New Berlin. There is still a possibility of finding an obituary. I also have made progress with the parents of Jeremiah Dyer's wife, Mary Smith. I am looking for the family of James Smith (her father) a British prisoner from the battle of Cowpens who remained in the US after the war,became a citizen, and moved to New Berlin. I have connected one of his daughters to Frederick Vail, son of Job Vail, one of the earliest settlers in New Berlin. I hope to connect the other daughter to Jeremiah Dyer whom I believe she married in 1806.' 
Birth*Oliver Dyer was born between 1740 and 1774. 
He was the son of Samuel Dyer and Patience Williams
Burial*Oliver Dyer was buried in New Berlin, Chenango County, New York

Family

Patience Sweet b. 1740
Children

Citations

  1. [S1348] William Allan Dyer, By the Name of Dyer, A Genealogical Record, 1940). Hereinafter cited as By the Name of Dyer.
  2. [S1371] Bertha Williams Anthony, Roger Williams of Providence, Rhode Island (: Mrs. C. W. Bertha Williams Anthony, 1949), 192. Hereinafter cited as Roger Williams of Providence, R.I.

Oliver Dyer1

M, b. 26 April 1824, d. 13 January 1907
FatherJeremiah Dyer
MotherMary Smith
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited22 Nov 2010
Note*He was educated at the public schools and was principal of a school in Lockport, N.Y., 1841-44. He subsequently took a course at the Genesee Wesleyan seminary at Lima, N.Y. He became interested in orthographic reform and studied Isaac Pitman's phonographic shorthand system, becoming an expert in the use of shorthand, and in 1848 accepted the position of reporter in the senate at Washington. He was admitted to the bar in 1854 and practised in New York City. The success of his sketch of 'The Wickedest Man in New York'(1868), led to his employment on the staffs of the New York Sun and other papers. In 1871 he agreed to write exclusively for the New York Ledger.He was ordained a minister in the Swedenborgian church in 1876 and became pastor of the New Church society at Mount Vernon, N.Y., where he ministered without pay. He is the author of: Great Senators of the United States Forty Years Ago (1889); Life of Andrew Jackson (1892). In 1899 he was a resident of Warren, R.I. I also have the original editions of his books The Great Senators (all of whom he knew personally) and General Andrew Jackson. In fact, I also just found out that he received the 'Sublime Degree of a Master Mason.' I found the paper inside one of these books where my mother had put it. According to a newspaper clipping about my grandfather Oliver, he passed the bar but never practiced law. He did, however, become the editor of the New York Ledger in 1871. A post he held for 20 years. (Sincerely, Jean Walsh Quinnett, 8/29/00) (from The NY Sun, Nov. 23, 1867) Our friend Oliver Dyer, the popular lecturer, who undertakes to tell people how to escape hell, has, we learn, fetched up in Sing Sing prison.He was captured last Sunday morning by the prison chaplain, and take into the chapel, where he first preached to the 1,800 male convicts, and prayed with them, in his original fashion, until he brought tears to their eyes. Then the chaplain made him go to the chapel for female convicts, and talk to them, which he did with even more power than he had talked to the males. The upshot of the morning's work was that the chaplain intends to have Mr. Dyer come again, and, in the meanwhile, has procured several hundred printed copies of a report of his remarks for distribution among the inmates of the prison. Yet the Methodist Christian Advocate sneers at Mr. Dyer as a lecturer whose name ought not to be mentioned even in its advertising columns.
For Village President, OLIVER DYER: Dear Sir:--The undersigned, your friends and neighbors, ask you to permit them to take such action as may be necessary to nominate you for the Village Presidency. Mount Vernon is year by year growing so rapidly,that it needs for its chief magistrate, a man full of energy, with wisdom and foresight to provide for its wants, with prudence and caution. To keep within its means, and with parliamentary skill and firmness necessary to give dignity and directness to the proceedings of the Board of Trustees. In looking for such a man, they naturally turn to you, and hope that you will give them the pleasure of placing you before your fellow citizens, as a candidate for the village presidency at the ensuing village election. (It lists 64 names and says 'and many others') Mount Vernon, May 17th, 1884. Col. Alfred Cooley, Hon. Isaac N. Mills, George R. Crawford, Esq. and others. Gentlemen-I have read your invitation to me, to be a candidate for the Village Presidency, with sentiments of profound thankfulness for the kindness and appreciation which inspired it. I heartily sympathise with your desires in respect to the government and interests of our beautiful village, and accept your invitation. Should I be elected President of the village, I will do my best to realize your expectations;and whether you succeed in the canvass or not, I shall never forget the neighbourly kindness which prompted you to such an expression of friendship and confidence. Very truly yours, OLIVER DYER (from New-Church Messenger Oct. 24, 1900). The Rev. Oliver Dyer. Oliver Dyer was born in the town of Porter, County of Niagara, and State of New York, on the 26th day of April, 1824. That region was then a dense wilderness. The Erie Canal had not yet been completed. The settlers had to chop their farms out of the wilderness. Oliver's parents were poor and so were all their neighbors. Life was then and there literally a struggle for existence and only the fittest survived. When Oliver was six years old his father sold his farm and moved to Lockport on the Erie Canal, which had become the great avenue of communication between Albany and the Lakes. Oliver was sent to school,and from the start made rapid progress in his studies. Parents then had to supply books for their children, and it was difficult for Oliver's parents to supply the books which his rapid progress rendered necessary,When he was eight years old he began to earn money with which to buy his own books and continued to do so as long as he remained at school. He was liberally helped in his endeavors by some of his teachers and a number of friends who admired the boy's pluck and ability. Oliver was a boy who always minded his own business. He never interfered with others, but if others interfered with him and forced him into a fight he fought with such desperation as to strike terror to the hearts of the aggressors. This trait of character had an important effect upon his career. When he was seventeen years old the trustees of one of the village schools were looking for a teacher. The school was utterly run down. The district in which it was situated was infested by a horde of young ruffians from sixteen to twenty-two years of age whose only object in going to school was to have a row. They repeatedly broke up the school and drove the teachers from the door. The trustees were in despair. At last one of them suggested that Oliver Dyer should engagedly to take charge of the school, because his well-known fighting powers would doubtless enable him to reduce the ruffians to order. It was a dangerous experiment to put a boy of seventeen into such a situation, but the experiment was tried and proved to be successful. Mr. Dyer provided himself with an iron-wood poker about five feet long and two inches in diameter. The first day's session of the school passed without any demonstration. On the morning of the second day the hitherto triumphant ruffians broke out into open rebellion. One of them was a burly fellow over six feet in height and every one of them was larger and more muscular than their teacher. The moment they showed fight Mr. Dyer felled the leader with his poker and attacked the others with such intrepidity that they were soon lying helpless on the floor. The battle was short and the result conclusive.As soon as order was restored the studies of the school went on and were never again interrupted by the least exhibition of disobedience. All the defeated ruffians became Mr. Dyer's warm friends and admirers and boasted of the superior order and discipline maintained in his school. The facts about his battle with the disturbers of the school spread through the village and gave intense satisfaction to everybody. He continued as head of the school until the sixth day of June, 1844, when he ended his career as a schoolteacher with a grand exhibition and festival. His salary had been raised to five hundred dollars a year, the largest then paid in the county, and he had saved money enough to pay his way through college. His mother's dearest wish was that Oliver should become a Methodist minister, of which Church he was a member. He yielded to her wishes and went to the Genesee Wesleyan Seminary in Lima, N.Y., but in a few months his mother suddenly died. This broke him up. His scientific pursuits had caused him to become dissatisfied with the Methodist theology. He accepted the teachings of geology, which were then considered atheistic.He also rejected the doctrine of the resurrection of the material body,and that of salvation by faith alone. In short, he was entirely broken up as to theology. He became a journalist and reporter. In the latter capacity he officiated in the United States Senate in the years 1848-49.He also studied law and was admitted to the New York Bar, where he practised for a quarter of a century. In 1865 he became interested in mission work in the slums of New York. He spent several years in investigating the causes and the remedies of the deplorable state of things which he found there. In 1868 he wrote his famous article on 'The Wickedest Man in New York', which caused a prodigious sensation and led to the extinction of seventy-two brothels and dance houses in the vilest portion of the city. Just at this time he became acquainted with the writings of the New Church. They were just what he had been looking for for years. They gave him the spiritual peace and satisfaction which he sorely needed. He united with the Thirty-fifth Street Church in New York in 1869. The Rev. Chauncey Giles was then the pastor of that Church. He became a warm friend of Mr. Dyer's and urged him to become a lay preacher of the doctrines. Mr. Dyer acceded to his wishes and began preaching. He continued in his pay preaching until 1876, when he was ordained as a minister of the New Church by the Rev. Chauncey Giles. For several years previous he had preached for the New-Church Society at Mt.Vernon, N.Y., where he resided, and he continued to act as the Pastor of that Church, without salary, until 1885, when his poor health compelled him to give up that work. He continued to preach occasionally in New York, Orange, New Jersey, and various other places. Many of his sermons have been published. One pamphlet, containing 'Six Sermons on New-Church Subjects' was published in 1888. In 1892 Mr. Dyer quit all work and removed to Providence, R.I., and subsequently to Warren, R.I. Since that time his health has been so poor that his preaching and lecturing and contributions to the press have been infrequent. It is probable that he will neither preach nor write anymore. [1892 was the year my mother was born. Actually, it was my grandmother who was in poor health due to breast cancer she developed in her mid to late forties.] (Submitted by Jran Walsh Quinnett, 9/4/00). 
Note*He was age 67 & she 34. 
Birth*Oliver Dyer was born on 26 April 1824 in Porter, Washington County, New York
He was the son of Jeremiah Dyer and Mary Smith
Marriage*Oliver Dyer married Annie Russell Brown, daughter of George Brown , Rev. and Caroline Tyson, on 26 September 1891 in Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island.2 
Death*Oliver Dyer died on 13 January 1907 in Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, at age 82.3 
Burial*He was buried in Forest Hills, Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.3 

Family 1

Unknown d. 1869
Children

Family 2

Annie Russell Brown b. 15 December 1857, d. 25 October 1919
Child

Citations

  1. [S1540] Editor Rossiter Johnson, 20th Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans (Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A.: The Biographical Society (on-line, Ancestry 1998), 1904). Hereinafter cited as 20th Century Biographical Dictionary.
  2. [S1392] Inc. 2000 Ancestry, "Vital Records of Rhode Island, 1636-1930 (database online)" (Orem, Utah). , 16:256. Hereinafter cited as "Vital Records of Rhode Island, 1636-1930."
  3. [S1469] Transcribed by Aurie W. Morrison, Massachusetts Death Vital Records for the Surname Dyer self published, 1907-6-461. Hereinafter cited as Massachusetts Death Vital Records - Dyer.

Oliver Dyer Jr.

M, b. 15 July 1861, d. 14 March 1884
FatherOliver Dyer b. 26 Apr 1824, d. 13 Jan 1907
MotherUnknown d. 1869
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited23 Nov 2010
Note*He died from an unfortunate accident in a boxing match at Yale University. He passed the examination at Harvard when he was only 16 and entered it at the age of 17. His eyes gave him so much trouble that he left and went to Paris to have them treated. In 1880 he began a scientific course in Columbia college, when his eyes again failed him. He took a sea voyage for his health, went out West and after two years, with the encouragement of his father entered Yale. (Granddaughter, Jean W. Quinnett has newspaper clippings of her mother's).
From 'The East Chester News', courtesy of Jean (Walsh) Quinnett, 9/4/00 A HARVARD MAN ON A TRAMP. HOW SUCH A TRAMP FEELS WHEN HE IS ON THE VERGE OF STARVATION. Strange experiences.-Recklessness induced by privation of sleep and food,--The kind of people who tramp.-- Their hardships and enjoyments. While on my way east from the lumber regions of Northern Michigan, it occurred to me to study tramps and tramping by personal observation and experience. I had done a good deal of walking in this country and France as a student, and I now resolved to tramp from Point Edward, Canada, on the river St. Clair, to New Bedford, Mass. So, sending my luggage home by express, I set out on my long tramp on the 23rd of October, 1881, witha meagre supply of money. I had a companion, a young Canadian, whose parents lived at St. Mary, about seventy, miles from Point Edward. He had been to the States to seek his fortune; had been ill a long time in Chicago; had become penniless, and was now trying to work his way home as best he could. Our first tramp was on the Grand Trunk railway, twenty-two miles, to Forest. The Canadian's shoes were so tight he could not make good time.Night overtook us. It was cold and rainy. We passed the night under some boards placed slantwise against a fence so as to form a sloping cover. My fellow tramp was a good English scholar, and familiar with English literature from Shakespeare to Tennyson. We beguiled the toilsome journey of the day and the tedious hours of the night with literary discussions. At Forest, my companion having become too lame to walk, we 'jumped a freight' at dusk. 'Jumping a freight' is tramp slang for taking an unobserved and free ride on a freight train. This was my first ride between cars. My companion stood on the very narrow platform of the forward car, holding on by a horizontal iron handle, with his hands behind him. I stood with one hand grasping the same handle, the other hand on the brake of the hind car, with a foot on each bumper, there being no platform on the back car to stand on. In such a position there is LIABILITY TO DEATH by the sudden parting of the train. I was at first uneasy, but familiarity with the situation soon bred indifference and recklessness. On a subsequent occasion, while sitting on one bumper, with my feet on the other, I dozed, with my hands in my pockets. Our train stopped at every station, until it reached St. Mary, where we wished to get off, and there it did not stop, but went dashing on to Stratford, ten miles beyond. The next day we crawled back to St. Mary,not being able to make two miles an hour, on account of my friend's lameness. We had had no hearty food since breakfast on Sunday morning,and it was now Tuesday afternoon. We had eaten during that time a few apples, a small load of bread, and six thin cookies. At last we procured some coarse food at a farm house for twenty cents, and made a hearty meal. On taking leave of my comrade at his home in St. Mary, I walked south at night, passing through London about midnight. A few miles further on I saw a large fire of brush and logs in a field. In attempting to reach it, I got into a swamp up to my knees. Getting upon firm ground , near the fire, I dried my shoes and socks, and lay down with my feet towards the burning heap, on a pile of brush between the fire and a steep hillside. Something rustled in the brush under me, but I would not move. Sleep I would, at any hazard. The brush on which I was lying might get on fire and set my clothes ablaze; but there was water enough in the swamp to extinguish me, and I could easily rolling to it. In my reckless state, indeed by excessive drowsiness, this thought amused me. I smiled, and fell asleep. A man becomes utterly reckless under privation of sleep. In such a state he will SLEEP AT ALL HAZARDS I have slept soaking with rain, with my hat over my face, beside railroad tracks and under station platforms, or hanging on between cars.In the latter case my hands kept awake and hung on, while the rest of my body slept. So doth 'sleep upon the high and giddy mast seal up the ship-boy's eyes, and rock his brains in cradle of the rude imperious surge.' I reached St. Thomas about eight o'clock next morning, having eaten four small apples on the way. Here I was hospitably received by kind friends, who were highly amused with my tramping career, and who sent me on my way with a pass across Lake Erie from Port Stanley to Buffalo.Thence I took a night tramp of twenty-two miles to Niagara Falls, taking three naps by the way; one in a cow-yard, where the cattle ate the straw off me, and the others on plank sidewalks. At Niagara Falls I reduced myself by extravagance nearly to the impecunious condition of the true tramp. When I left the railroad bridge I had sixty-three cents in money, twenty-four cents in postage-stamps,twenty-five cents worth of Canada plug tobacco, and a few matches. I walked, in four days, to Palmyra, about ninety miles, sleeping in barns, and eating Bologna sausage, raw onions, bread, and a few raw turnips and cabbages. At Palmyra I 'jumped a freight' at dusk, and rode between cars to Syracuse. Wishing to experience a phase of tramp-life to which I was as yet a stranger, I put up at a station-house, and slept on a wooden bench,in an iron cage, next to a crazy man. In the morning, while I was trying to 'hire out' on the canal, a sweet-voiced vagabond borrowed tobacco of me; then a mean-looking,vagabond asked for a 'chaw'; then a tattered rapscallion, with a brutal face. This last was 'Billy,' from Oswego. He was a professional beggar,and made, when he stuck to his business, a dollar a day, besides food and clothing. The winter he passed in jail. His two companions were his parasites, who paid court to him and lived on his acquisitions. Like every great man, he had his weakness. He wished to be thought a terrible fighter, though all 'broke up.' His joyous companions profited by his vanity, paying court to him, flattering him, and keeping him at work begging, and then cajoling him into spending his earnings upon them. These men presented a phase of human nature that was new to me. I had no idea that such a :dead beat' as Billy could have parasites to flatter and cajole him, and live on his revenues, and be content so to live. But, 'fleas have other fleas to bite 'em.' These were the only really abject men I met; men who preferred beggary to work and independence. I have often been asked what sort of men tramps are. They are all sorts. No particular kind of man tramps. So far as my experience goes,most of them, are either men who, having left home, have been sick or unsuccessful, and are returning home penniless; or else laboring men looking for work; or men of limited resources who wish to better their condition by getting west. Often they are men of education and of good family. There are, of course, a number of ragamuffins, and many vulgar ruffians, and the general effect of tramping is, by freedom from the restraints of public opinion, and temptation through hunger, to lower the tone. At Utica, I jumped another freight. After riding forty miles, I was so cold that I got off and walked to warm myself. Next morning, I found seven slices of bread and butter beside the track. The morning after that, I found bread, meat, and mince pie; on another occasion, a nice roasted chicken. 'The YOUNG LIONS roar after their prey and seek their meat from God. * * * These wait all upon Thee; that Thou mayest give them their meat in due season.' At Schenectady I spent my last postage stamp. Just out of Albany, I met a well dressed young fellow, who gave me some tobacco. His method of traveling one division of a railroad, was to learn the names of a conductor and his brakemen on the next division, and claim to be of their crew. I jumped my last freight to Pitsfield, Mass.It was too cold to ride. Next day, I kept on east. I was without food and money. Late in the afternoon, with reluctance I begged at a farmhouse, but being refused, I preferred hunger to further begging.Next day my appetite was improved. I knew of no work for which I was fit. Begging was repugnant.Passing through a village, I picked up a piece of cracker, and a raw turnip in the streets. On the outskirts a fishmonger threw the head and dorsal fin of a fish in the road. From these I chewed the flesh. It tasted good. I was wild with hunger. I have heard it said that hunger makes one cowardly. This may be so in extreme cases but the contrary is true as long as the strength is not seriously impaired. The blood mounted to my face. I was feverish. My eyes felt strange. I have noticed in others that hunger makes the eyes fierce and mobile like a wild beast's. I felt reckless.Nothing seemed repugnant which gave any promise of food. I begged. At the first house, a young man came to the door. I heard a woman say within, 'If he is a grown man, he shan't have anything.' The young man said he had nothing. At the next house I asked a woman for a piece of bread. 'No, sir; not a thing!' she answered. I bowed sullenly, and went on. At the third house I saw a saw-horse. My heart leaped within me. Perhaps I could get a chance to saw wood. On my application an old gentleman came out and gave me permission to work for a meal. I instantly had my coat off with a right good will. After I had worked about ten minutes the old gentleman called me in, saying I could not work well while hungry, and invited me to take a meal which he evidently had prepared for me. There was a large, round dish of potatoes warmed in milk, plenty of beefsteak, bread and butter, a quarter of an apple pie,and part of a loaf of gingerbread. I cleared the table. After finishing my job I kept on east. On reaching Palmer, east of Springfield, I turned southeast into Connecticut, intending to go to New Bedford. I reached Killingly, Conn., on Thursday morning, November 17th.Here two men, who had been on a spree, took me for A HORSE THIEF until they learned the whereabouts of their animals from a passing baker. All others treated me with great kindness. I got a job to saw wood, for which I was to receive two dollars. It took me a day and a half to doit. As I was finishing it, on Friday night, some of the bystanders, who had gathered to see me work, helped me out, each sawing a few sticks. I was now about one hundred and forty-five miles from home. I resolved to spend Thanksgiving with my relatives instead of going to New Bedford. I had five days to tramp the distance. On Saturday night I reached Mansfield, east of Hartford, dripping with rain. Entering a barn, I stripped to my undershirt and buried my clothes and then myself in the hay, so as not to have my rest disturbed by any intrusive barn-owner. I was out before sunrise. There was ice on the ground, and a strong west wind. My coat was soon frozen. My hands were too numb to hold a match to light it. My right arm was numb to the elbow. I was demoralized; but fast walking, the wind, and the rising sun, in time dried my clothes and restored my spirits. Pushing through Hartford I made my longest march of forty-eight miles. About eight miles from New Haven I entered a barn. Here I wrapped myself in three blankets, and lay in a heap on the seat of a carry-all.About six o'clock in the morning a man with a lantern came to attend to this horse. I held my breath. He took a pail near me, but evidently thought I was a heap of blankets. On the noon of Wednesday, November 23d, I reached home, having traveled about two hundred miles by freight and five hundred and fifty on foot in exactly a month. The great question in tramping is food. The more cultured a man is the more painful is begging. He has a strong repugnance to it, which only time and extreme hunger will subdue. As a rule he will even prefer to steal. Whenever he becomes known as a respectable man, he is apt to be treated kindly; but it is next to impossible to become thus known. Even if he were to stick up his college diploma or certificate of moral character on the breast of his very seedy coat, it would not overcome the suspicion which springs spontaneous in the human breast at sight of a tramp. Again, a Washington or a Franklin on a tramp would acquire 'a lean and hungry look,' from which all recoil with the instinctive feeling,that 'such men are dangerous.' Doubtless they are. I happened to get a glimpse of myself in a looking-glass in a railroad station near Palmer,Mass. I had a peculiarly bad eye-a shameless, untrustworthy eye. It,perhaps, expressed the soul within. Indeed, it would have required a childlike trust to have then made me custodian of a pantry or night-watchman of a bakery. In spite of cold, hunger and fatigue, I heartily enjoyed my adventure. I was living a primitive life, a free nomadic life. The life of civilization is made up largely of the pleasures and ills of imagination, the demands of interdependent relations. It was pleasant to me to abandon this life for a time and gauge my happiness by the clemency of the weather and the fullness of my stomach. O .D., Jr. 
Birth*Oliver Dyer Jr. was born on 15 July 1861. 
He was the son of Oliver Dyer and Unknown
Death*Oliver Dyer Jr. died on 14 March 1884 at age 22. 
Burial*He was buried in Woodlawn Cemetery, Mt. Vernon, New York

Olivia Dyer

F, b. 16 August 1892, d. 26 October 1984
FatherOliver Dyer b. 26 Apr 1824, d. 13 Jan 1907
MotherAnnie Russell Brown b. 15 Dec 1857, d. 25 Oct 1919
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited23 Nov 2010
Birth*Olivia Dyer was born on 16 August 1892 in Narragansett Pier, Rhode Island
She was the daughter of Oliver Dyer and Annie Russell Brown
Marriage*Olivia Dyer married William Thomas Walsh, son of John Walsh and Annie McCauliffe, on 22 September 1916 in Kansas City, Jackson, Missouri
Death*Olivia Dyer died on 26 October 1984 in Orlando, Florida, at age 92. 
Burial*She was buried in Orlando, Florida

Family

William Thomas Walsh b. 29 September 1887, d. 16 May 1973

Olney Dyer1,2,3

M, b. 24 April 1771, d. 28 March 1840
FatherCharles Dyer b. 21 Nov 1742, d. 14 Aug 1823
MotherPhebe Pearce b. 25 May 1743, d. 5 May 1822
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Note*1850 RI Census, Olney Dyer, #246, Ward 4, Providence. died 68 years. 1840 Dyer Olney will A6008 'Mrs. Hannah, wife of Olney, in this town (Providence), in 46th year, Aug7, 1815' REF: Vital Records of RI, Vol X111 Deaths, Arnold. 
Birth*Olney Dyer was born on 24 April 1771. 
He was the son of Charles Dyer and Phebe Pearce
Marriage*Olney Dyer married Hannah Tourtelotte on 18 July 1792.2 
Marriage*Olney Dyer married Sybil Perrin on 11 September 1816 in Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island.2,4 
Death*Olney Dyer died on 28 March 1840 in Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, at age 68.5,6 

Family 1

Hannah Tourtelotte b. 11 October 1769, d. 7 August 1815
Children

Family 2

Sybil Perrin b. 11 September 1784, d. 5 December 1875
Children

Citations

  1. [S1379] World Family Tree, online ancestry.com, Vol. 15, #1869. Hereinafter cited as World Family Tree.
  2. [S1348] William Allan Dyer, By the Name of Dyer, A Genealogical Record, 1940), ND245. Hereinafter cited as By the Name of Dyer.
  3. [S1371] Bertha Williams Anthony, Roger Williams of Providence, Rhode Island (: Mrs. C. W. Bertha Williams Anthony, 1949), 160. Hereinafter cited as Roger Williams of Providence, R.I.
  4. [S1567] Edwin M. Snow, Births, Marriages & Deaths Recorded in Providence 1636-1850 (Providence, Rhode Island: Sidney S. Rider, 1879). Hereinafter cited as Births, Marriages & Deaths in Providence 1636-1850.
  5. [S1567] Edwin M. Snow, Births, Marriages & Deaths Recorded in Providence 1636-1850 (Providence, Rhode Island: Sidney S. Rider, 1879), 445. Hereinafter cited as Births, Marriages & Deaths in Providence 1636-1850.
  6. [S1392] Inc. 2000 Ancestry, "Vital Records of Rhode Island, 1636-1930 (database online)" (Orem, Utah). , 6:21. Hereinafter cited as "Vital Records of Rhode Island, 1636-1930."

Olney Dyer1

M, b. 3 August 1807, d. 10 September 1807
FatherOlney Dyer b. 24 Apr 1771, d. 28 Mar 1840
MotherHannah Tourtelotte b. 11 Oct 1769, d. 7 Aug 1815
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Birth*Olney Dyer was born on 3 August 1807. 
He was the son of Olney Dyer and Hannah Tourtelotte
Death*Olney Dyer died on 10 September 1807. 

Citations

  1. [S1348] William Allan Dyer, By the Name of Dyer, A Genealogical Record, 1940), 246. Hereinafter cited as By the Name of Dyer.

Otis Dyer1

M, b. before 1797
FatherAnthony Dyer , Jr. b. 1765, d. 1835
MotherChloe Bucklin d. 8 Jun 1797
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited12 Dec 2002
Birth*Otis Dyer was born before 1797. 
He was the son of Anthony Dyer , Jr. and Chloe Bucklin

Citations

  1. [S1488] Adin Ballou, Ellaborate History and Genealogy of the Ballous in America (Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.A.: E. L. Freeman & Co., 1888), 70. Hereinafter cited as Ellaborate History and Genealogy of the Ballous.

Otis Dyer1

M, b. after 1763
FatherAnthony Dyer b. 23 Jun 1743, d. 2 Dec 1808
MotherSarah Bishop b. 1744, d. 16 Feb 1841
ChartsDescendants of William Dyer
Last Edited17 Dec 2006
Birth*Otis Dyer was born after 1763. 
He was the son of Anthony Dyer and Sarah Bishop

Citations

  1. [S1371] Bertha Williams Anthony, Roger Williams of Providence, Rhode Island (: Mrs. C. W. Bertha Williams Anthony, 1949), 180. Hereinafter cited as Roger Williams of Providence, R.I.